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What reasons does Brutus give for joining the conspiracy to assassinate Caesar in...

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shivarnnim | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted March 10, 2012 at 9:48 PM via web

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What reasons does Brutus give for joining the conspiracy to assassinate Caesar in Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare?

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cute-roses | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted March 14, 2012 at 9:32 PM (Answer #1)

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Brutus says that though he loved Caeser, he LOVED ROME MORE and that if caesar came into power he would make all the citizens of rome as slaves. He says that because Caeser was AMBITIOUS he killed him!

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carol-davis | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted December 21, 2012 at 4:21 PM (Answer #2)

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Caesar had a high regard for Brutus's reputation for honesty and for his scholarship. Cassius despised Caesar and began to plot against him. Brutus took a great deal of convincing, but he eventually agreed to become a leader of the conspiracy, and it was in fact Brutus who gave a speech to the people immediately after Caesar was killed.

In Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, Cassius believes that he must have Brutus as a member of the conspirators.  Brutus had a reputation of honesty and persuasive skills that Cassius knew would be needed one the assassination took place. In addition, Brutus was known for his logical, reasoning and strong oratorical skills. 

Cassius believes that he must have Brutus as a member of the conspirators.  Brutus had a reputation of honesty and persuasive skills that Cassius knew would be needed one the assassination took place. In addition, Brutus was known for his logical, reasoning and strong oratorical skills. 

In Act II, Scene I, Brutus is at war with himself.  He does not know what he should do.  In the past, he has been close to Caesar.  Now, he fears the power that Caesar will be given by the senate to him one the Ides of March. 

Brutus speaks in a soliloquy trying to establish what he believes. He knows that later in the morning Cassius will be there to again try to enlist him to join the conspiracy. 

The first issue that Brutus raises is that he has decided that Caesar has to die. On the other hand, he has nothing against him personally.  His death is necessary for the good of the people.  He wants to be crowned the king of Rome.  Brutus wonders how that would change Caesar.

Using the image of a serpent or deadly venomous snake, a person must be careful when around one.  If Caesar is crowned, would he become like the snake and have a sting that would endanger the good of Rome.

Crown him? That; And then, I grant, we put a sting in him 
That at his will he may do danger with. 
The abuse of greatness is when it disjoins
Remorse from power...

When men become powerful, often they lose they common touch; however, Brutus has never seen Caesar show anything but love for the people of Rome. 

Another analogy by Brutus compares Caesar to someone who is climbing the ladder of success.  The ambitious person who is going up the ladder keeps his eye on the goal; yet, when he achieves the highest level, the person often forget those who helped and only focuses on his own achievements.  Caesar may do this, so he needs to be eliminated. 

Referring again to the serpent analogy, Brutus extended the argument. 

Think of Caesar as a serpent egg.  In the nest, it is just an egg.  If the snake hatches, then it becomes deadly and could be harmful.  The best thing to do is to kill the snake while it is still in the egg and avoid the possibility of its sting; so that is what the Romans should do with Caesar.  Kill him before he misuses his power.

Brutus further explains that he has not slept since Cassius first asked him to listen to his opinions about Caesar.  He has been haunted by what he should do.

When Cassius and the other conspirators come to speak to him, Brutus immediately becomes a part of the conspiracy.  The beginning of the end of normalcy for Rome and its citizens has begun. 

Sources:

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chavda211 | Student | (Level 1) Salutatorian

Posted March 10, 2012 at 10:28 PM (Answer #3)

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Brutus's reason to kill Caesar is that if Caesar rose in power then the citizens of Rome will not be happy. To Brutus, Rome and its people were the most important thing to him and he would do anything to make sure that nothing happened to his country or its people even if that meant killing his close friend, Caesar.

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