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What is the relationship between Oliver and Orlando in the beginning and at the end of...

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greatestakash | Student | eNoter

Posted June 27, 2012 at 4:26 PM via web

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What is the relationship between Oliver and Orlando in the beginning and at the end of the play?

I study in class 9th and have got an assignment of 600 words and have to submit it in July. Please help!!!!

I will be grateful to you.

Thanks.

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William Delaney | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted June 28, 2012 at 12:22 AM (Answer #1)

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At the beginning of the play Oliver and Orlando hate each other. Oliver has inherited their deceased father's entire estate under the law of primogeniture (first-born son inherits everything). He supports Orlando grudgingly and prevents him from educating himself as a gentleman. He even tries to have Orlando killed in a match with the professional wrestler Charles. Because of Oliver's tyranical behavior, Orlando is forced to flee to the Forest of Arden, where he meets Rosalind disguised as Ganymede. Duke Ferdinand believes that his daughter is with Rosalind and Orlando for a rather complicated reason. He had banished Rosalind, his niece, unjustly, and his own daughter Celia left with her without his knowledge or consent. He knows that Rosalind was infatuated with Orlando, and he assumes that Orlando is with Rosalind and that his daughter is with them both. So he orders Oliver to pursue them and bring back Celia. Eventually Orlando saves Oliver's life when his brother is attacked by a lion. This event makes Oliver regret his former hostility toward Orlando, and in fact he becomes a miraculously changed man. He decides to remain in the Forest of Arden, marry Celia, and give the entire estate to Orlando, who is going to marry Rosalind in a joint wedding ceremony. So the brothers begin by hating each other and end by loving each other in true brotherly fashion. The plot of As You Like It is complicated and fanciful, but being a comedy is not intended to be taken too seriously.

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