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What reasons does Atticus give for the children not to play the Boo Radley game? Do you...

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babygirl21 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 12, 2008 at 10:16 AM via web

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What reasons does Atticus give for the children not to play the Boo Radley game? Do you think he is right? Why?

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ms-mcgregor | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted September 12, 2008 at 7:07 PM (Answer #2)

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The children, Scout, Jem, and Dill, have been acting out their ideas about the Radleys in much the same way they had previously acted out stories they had read. This shows that they view the family as just a part of their fictional games. They don't see the Radleys as real people and the don't realize that their game may be hurtful to real humans behind the Radley windows. Atticus catches them and orders them to “stop tormenting that man” with either notes or the “Boo Radley” game. As an adult, Atticus can see the real hurt the game may be causing. In a quiet way, he reminds the children that “What Mr. Radley does is his own business.” So Atticus has taught the children as lesson about respecting other people. This foreshadows the lesson he will try to to teach the town of of Maycomb by defending Tom Robinson. Most people today would agree that Atticus was right.

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bubblesrush31 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 25, 2012 at 6:40 AM (Answer #4)

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The children, Scout, Jem, and Dill, have been acting out their ideas about the Radleys in much the same way they had previously acted out stories they had read. This shows that they view the family as just a part of their fictional games. They don't see the Radleys as real people and the don't realize that their game may be hurtful to real humans behind the Radley windows. Atticus catches them and orders them to “stop tormenting that man” with either notes or the “Boo Radley” game. As an adult, Atticus can see the real hurt the game may be causing. In a quiet way, he reminds the children that “What Mr. Radley does is his own business.” So Atticus has taught the children as lesson about respecting other people. This foreshadows the lesson he will try to to teach the town of of Maycomb by defending Tom Robinson. Most people today would agree that Atticus was right.

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