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What questions would you ask Romeo in an interview?What questions would you ask Romeo...

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whitneyo | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted July 2, 2010 at 3:14 AM via web

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What questions would you ask Romeo in an interview?

What questions would you ask Romeo in an interview?

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lynnebh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted July 2, 2010 at 5:08 AM (Answer #2)

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What an interesting question!

Romeo's character, although it matures as the play develops, is still somewhat impulsive. For example, Romeo is in love with Rosaline when the play opens, and is is mooning about because she spurns him, but then he goes to a party at the Capulet's and immediately falls in love with Juliet. Then, during the duel where Mercutio is killed, Romeo jumps into the fray and kills Tybalt. In front of Juliet's tomb, he fights and kills Paris without telling him why he is there. When he sees Juliet dead, he immediately decides to kill himself without checking into the situation -- perhaps finding Friar Lawrence and asking him what happened.

So, if I ran into Romeo in the afterlife, I would ask him, "Hey, Romeo. I have a question for you. Don't you think you were kind of impulsive when you were down on earth?"

He might respond, "Forsooth! I was fortune's fool!"

And then I would say, "If you could do one thing over again, what would it be?"

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted July 2, 2010 at 7:41 AM (Answer #3)

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This is an interesting task.  I concur with the previous post.  I think that the first thing you need to figure out as you compose the questions is an elemental one:  Did you find him sympathetic or simply pathetic?  I know that it might be a bit reductive to bring him to such a distinction, but I think doing so might help to hone in on the questions you want to ask.  If you found him to be sympathetic, you could certainly ask him about the feelings he experienced before seeing Juliet or whether he felt any real sense of belonging to his family, even before engaging in what transpired with Juliet.  If you found him to be a figure for which you didn't feel much in way of sympathy, you could ask him about whether he feels some level of responsibility for what happened in terms of Juliet's life being ruined and the loss that was brought on by his pursuit of her.  It might be interesting to note his reaction here.  Do you think he would say that it was mutual, something that he did on his own, or something for which he would blame Juliet?  Of course, you could do a hybrid interview that is at both levels sympathetic and critical.  That might be the best way to go, but I think being able to try to bring out the character in a modern setting of questions is where this assignment will really move you into a deeper understanding of the topic.

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted July 2, 2010 at 8:26 AM (Answer #4)

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You already have some interesting ideas.  I tend to view Romeo as an impetuous, immature, lovesick teenager who loves the idea of being in love.  (As you can see, I'm more of a realist than a romantic.)  My question is simple:  Romeo, what is your definition of love?

When he "loves" Rosaline and then loses her, his reaction is exaggeratedly sad.  He mopes around in the dark, crying and sighing.  When he "loves" Juliet--even marries her--and then apparently loses her forever when he is banished, he does none of that. 

So again, my question for Romeo is, "What is love?"

Lori Steinbach

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clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted July 2, 2010 at 3:35 PM (Answer #5)

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I would ask him:

  1. What skills do you have besides sword fighting?
  2. Could you have lived with Juliet without your parents money?  How?
  3. Would you have had kids?  If your own children had done what you and Juliet did, how would you have responded?
  4. Had you and Juliet actually lived, do you think your families would have forgiven both of you and each other?  How long would you have been willing to wait for that to happen?
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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted July 5, 2010 at 1:51 PM (Answer #6)

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Since no stipulation has been made that Romeo is already dead when interviewed, the interview may be supposed to have occurred while he was banished in Mantua.  If this were the case such questions as these may have been asked?

1. Knowing the virulent hatred between your family and the Capulets, why did you defy your parents by pursuing Juliet?

2. Rumor has it that Friar Laurence has been closely involved with your relationship with Juliet.  First, you were observed heading to his cell on the night of the Capulet party.  Then, a day later, Juliet has been reported as coming to his cell shortly after Paris was reported there.  Any comments?

3.  What exactly happened on the fateful day in which your friend Mercutio died?  One of our reporters overheard your friend Benvolio say that you came between the angered Mercutio and Tybalt.

4.  Why was Mercutio so angry that day?

5.  Why did you cry out, "Oh, I am fortune's fool!"

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copelmat | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted July 10, 2010 at 10:17 AM (Answer #7)

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I suppose my questions would be aimed at getting Romeo to reflect upon his experiences and tap into any insight he might now possess:

  • What did you learn from your experiences?
  • What is the nature of true love?
  • How should family feuds be handled?
  • How important is revenge?
  • What are your regrets?
  • If you had it to do all over, what would you do differently?
  • What advice would you give to to others in a similar situation?
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ladyspain | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted July 11, 2010 at 6:37 AM (Answer #8)

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What an interesting question!

Romeo's character, although it matures as the play develops, is still somewhat impulsive. For example, Romeo is in love with Rosaline when the play opens, and is is mooning about because she spurns him, but then he goes to a party at the Capulet's and immediately falls in love with Juliet. Then, during the duel where Mercutio is killed, Romeo jumps into the fray and kills Tybalt. In front of Juliet's tomb, he fights and kills Paris without telling him why he is there. When he sees Juliet dead, he immediately decides to kill himself without checking into the situation -- perhaps finding Friar Lawrence and asking him what happened.

So, if I ran into Romeo in the afterlife, I would ask him, "Hey, Romeo. I have a question for you. Don't you think you were kind of impulsive when you were down on earth?"

He might respond, "Forsooth! I was fortune's fool!"

And then I would say, "If you could do one thing over again, what would it be?"

Actually, impulsive as only a teen at the tender age of 16 can be.  He was running entirely on his hormones.  If you think about the length of time that this actually covers, the whole falling in love, getting married, and death takes place well within a week.  Impulsive is an understatement.  My other question is that as flighty as Romeo has been in his recent past, how do we know even this love would have "stuck" or would it be more like "lust at first sight." If you read young Will Shakespeare's life story, you'll see that he, too was impulsive, going from one affair to another while having his wife Anne back in Stratford.  I wonder if he knew about a real relationship?

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ladyspain | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted July 11, 2010 at 6:45 AM (Answer #9)

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The characters of both Romeo and Juliet are subjects of many hours of debate in some of my English classes.  Of course I was taken with the story whenn I read it as a 9th grader, but now having taught it for many years, I've really had a light go on as far as interpretation.  Romeo was 16.  Yes, I realize that that was not young for that period of time because people didn't live that long, however, mentally and emotionally he was still 16.  He had all the passions of a 16 year old controlled by his hormones and driven by impulsivity.  The entire story from happy star-crossed beginning to tragic ending takes place in less than a week.  Romeo's past is speckled (like Will Shakespeare's) with girls he has impulsively loved and left behind.  He thinks Juliet is it.  And for that moment, much to his unfortunate end, she is the end all. The question is I believe, would this relationship built on "lust at first sight" actually have survived the tedium of marriage and family.  This could be a very interesting question for Romeo.  Say Romeo, "Do you still think you'll love her 20 years from now when she's older?  When she's had a couple of kids?"  Hmmmmm, now there's a questio for Romeo!

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dafe | Student, Grade 11 | Salutatorian

Posted July 11, 2010 at 7:12 AM (Answer #10)

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my first question to him to romeo will be..... 1. what is love ?? is it really hurts if it hurts why it gives pain too much ?? 2. how can one love someone by true heart?? 3. why he loved juliet & juliet loved him ?? 4.what's age to fall in love ?? i know there is no time no reason for this but i want to know this answers from him.
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arjun | College Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted November 9, 2013 at 7:20 AM (Answer #11)

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There are so many questions but I will say,'Are you satisfied from such end?'

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