Homework Help

What are the point of view, setting, and theme of "The Invisible Japanese Gentlemen"?

user profile pic

tinhvotan2002 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 21, 2009 at 3:53 AM via web

dislike 2 like

What are the point of view, setting, and theme of "The Invisible Japanese Gentlemen"?

1 Answer | Add Yours

user profile pic

linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted April 21, 2009 at 3:52 AM (Answer #1)

dislike 4 like

The point of view of this story is third-person. The narrator is an unnamed man who decides to have lunch at Bentley's, a restaurant in London, which answers your question about the setting. One of the themes of this story is lack of observation. The young woman is excited about having her first novel published and is especially pleased that her published praised her "powers of observation." However, when her fiance mentions the Japanese men who were seated near them, she admits that she never even noticed they were there. Another theme might be called the wisdom of age versus the naivete of youth. The narrator himself is an author, and as he listens to the woman go on and on about how successful she knows she will be, he can't help thinking how naive she is. Getting one novel published does not make someone a best-selling author. She has already spent her royalties in her imagination, but what if the book doesn't sell? She'd do better to let her fiance take the job with his uncle than to dream of a rich life in St. Tropez.

Visit the links below for more information.

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes