What poetic devices are used in Edgar Allan Poe's poem "Dreamland"?

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jmj616's profile pic

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Edgar Allan Poe uses a variety of poetic devices in his dark, haunting poem, "Dreamland."  Here are some of them. 

1) Rhyme: The poem consists of rhyming couplets, meaning that line a and b rhyme, lines c and d rhyme, and so on.

2) Rhythm: Most of the poem's line contain 8 syllables.

3) Alliteration: Poe often packs a line with words that begin with the same consonant sound.  For example:

wild wierd

Bottomless vales and boundless floods

dews that drip all over

4) Assonance: Poe sometimes packs a line with words that have the same vowel sound in the middle position.  For example:

wild weird clime that lieth sublime

Their still waters--still and chilly

5) Personification: Poe describes non-human entities as if they were human.  For example, he writes that "NIGHT,/ on a black throne reigns upright."

6) Allusion: Poe uses references to literature and mythology.  Look up the origin of Titan and Eldorado

michael-niagara's profile pic

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The poetic devices used in Edgar Allan Poe's poem "Dreamland" include the following:

Stanzas
 
This poem is divided into five stanzas of varying lengths. Stanza number 1 is eight lines. Stanza number 2 is twelve lines. Stanza number 3 is eighteen lines. Stanza number 4 is twelve lines. Stanza number 5 is six lines.
 
Repetition
 
Edgar Allan Poe employs repetition to give the poem some foundational structure. Repetition causes a reader to reconsider a previous thought. Repetition can add musicality to a poem, just as a repeated riff, line, or chorus in music does.
 
Anexample of repetition in the poem Dreamland is the line:
 
“Where an Eidolon, named NIGHT,”
 
This line is first stated in stanza number 1 – line 3.  It is repeated in stanza number 5 in line 3.
 
Another example of repetition in the poem Dreamland is the line:
 
“With the snows of the lolling lily”
 
This line is first stated in stanza number 2 – line 12.  It is repeated in stanza number 3 in line 4.
 
End Rhyme
 
Rhyme is employed extensively in Dreamland. Poe utilizes rhyming couplets. The last word of one line rhymes with the last word of the next line. For example, in stanza number 1, line 1 rhymes with line 2; line 3 rhymes with line 4; line 5 rhymes with line 6, and line 7 rhymes with line 8. This progression of rhyming couplets continues downward in the poem until the very end.
 
Internal Rhyme
 
This occurs when words rhyme within the same line. In Dreamland, an example is in stanza 1, line number 7:
 
“From a wild weird clime that lieth, sublime,”
 
Alliteration
 
The repeating of initial consonant sounds signifies the poetic element of alliteration. Examples in Poe’s Dreamland include:
 
a) “From a wild weird clime that lieth, sublime,
 
b) “And chasms, and caves, and Titan woods,”
 
c) “But the traveller, travelling through it,”
 
Hyperbole
 
Hyperbole is employed to make a point - to convey by way of exaggeration a truth the poet wants to get across. In Dreamland, Poe use hyperbole in stanza 1, line 7 and 8:
 
“From a wild weird clime that lieth, sublime,
       Out of SPACE—Out of TIME.”
 
He’s exaggerating here with words to indicate that he’s reached his destination (these lands) from a strange atmosphere and “Out of SPACE—Out of TIME.” This is meant to show his odd journey and is not meant to be taken literally because no one can come from a place that’s out of space or out of time.

Sources:

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