What other things did Jonathan Edwards do besides writing? Did he play sports or did he just spend most of his time reading or idk?  

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Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

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Jonathan Edwards was prepared for a place at Yale University (a new institution) by the time he was thirteen years old. Calvinistic Puritanism still had an iron hold on New England--though it was loosening to other denominations and Deism--and Edwards was reared in its tradition. When a freshman at Yale, Edwards experienced a religious upheaval because of his personal attempt to come to terms with the evidentially unsupported assertion of John Calvin's doctrine that salvation was solely up to God's predetermined election--God's unmitigated choice--and that very few were elected, or chosen. He eventually resigned himself to this doctrine of "God's sovereignty."

Edwards graduated from Yale to study theology then to serve as a Presbyterian minister then to return to Yale as a tutor (professor) for two years. He was then ordained and assumed his grandfather's congregation in Connecticut. Edwards led the life of a Calvinistic Puritan scholar and fun, sports, frivolity were not part of a Puritan man's life after leaving boyhood. As an adult scholar and theologian, most of Edward's time was spent preparing his weekly sermons, which included extensive research and wide reading, and tending to the clerical needs of his congregation.

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lynnebh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

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Jonathan Edwards? Are you referring to the Massachusetts Puritan preacher? If so, Jonathan Edwards is considered one of the foremost theologians in American history. He was a reformed theologian (Calvinistic), and he wrote and spoke profusely on these matters. His "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" (a sermon, which we read in our lit books) is considered a major work in American literature, although, sadly, it does not represent Edwards' true belief in a loving God that wants all men to be saved. It is often misinterpreted because it is read out of context as an example of Puritan writings and thrown into the Puritan period in many American lit books. It can be much better understood if one reads the body of his works.

Edwards was also a missionary to the Native Americans. He went to Yale and played an important role in the Great Awakening (a period of religious revival in the mid-1700s). He had 11 children, so perhaps he may have played some simple sports with them like tossing a ball, etc., but you would have to consult his biography to find this answer. See the link below and also the Edwards Group here on eNotes.

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