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What is the meaning of the following quote from 1984?There will be no curiosity, no...

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ciaranbowen | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 4, 2011 at 11:40 PM via web

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What is the meaning of the following quote from 1984?

There will be no curiosity, no enjoyment of the process of life. All competing pleasures will be destroyed. But always— do not forget this, Winston— always there will be the intoxication of power, constantly increasing and constantly growing subtler. Always, at every moment, there will be the thrill of victory, the sensation of trampling on an enemy who is helpless. If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face— forever.

 

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missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted September 5, 2011 at 2:29 AM (Answer #1)

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This is O'Brien trying to brainwash Winston. For the last several months, Winston has enjoyed life at least as much as possible in that society. However, the society is marred with oppressive power. This is what O'Brien eventually alluded to in this quote.

He wants Winston to understand that the power the Party contains is an addiction itself. That power grows with the dumbing down of the people with every new generation and every new lie. For the strong, for those in power, this power is a fulfilling feeling. O'Brien is trying to convey to Winston that there is no turning back. This process of gaining power over the masses of people has already begun and it will snowball into a power so strong that the people will never again gain their individuality. The ideas of no curiosity or enjoyment allude to this dumbing down of the people. They will not know to search for these human traits because they will not have previously experienced them nor will they know that they are capable of them because they are just not allowed.

 

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