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What are the main differences between Antigone and Creon?

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zanamuno | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 10, 2012 at 10:11 PM via web

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What are the main differences between Antigone and Creon?

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted January 11, 2012 at 2:58 AM (Answer #1)

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The first difference is gender. Creon, as a male ruler, is responsible for the welfare of the entire city. Antigone, as female, has a special role in the family, and particularly family burial rites. Thus both in doing their traditional tasks come into conflict with each other.

In religion, Creon follows the proper protocol of consulting a religious authority, Tireisias. Antigone, at the start of the play, takes making the choice of burial upon herself, albeit in concord with her traditional feminine duties.

By gender and position, Creon is in the position of the superior and decision maker, Antigone that of follower and subordinate.

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princessita-2-day | Student, Grade 11 | Valedictorian

Posted January 10, 2012 at 11:37 PM (Answer #2)

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Creon is a king of the Thebes Kingdom and  Antigone is the princess of the kingdom too. the difference is that Antigone does things for the love of others but Creon has too much pride in doing what is correct and normally does not mind the opinion of others.

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geannieweazles | Student, Grade 10 | eNoter

Posted February 27, 2012 at 6:52 PM (Answer #3)

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I disagree with thanatassa.

The main difference apart from gender would be the principles of the two. Firstly, Antigone believes in family honour, whereas Creon belives in only himself, and upholding what he thinks is good for the city. His autocratic rule provides little discussion and is implemented without debate, with the help and support of the Chorus who pleases him: "Your will is law".

Antigone, also, believes in the Divinity of the Gods, to which she refers to throughout the play, and even uses to threaten Creon in his regime. Creon, on the other hand believes that he is well above the Gods so when the Chorus suggests that the burial of Polynices could have been "an act of Gods",  this angers him because of the Gods are a threat to his ruling.

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