Homework Help

What are important quotes in chapter 4 about the Boo Radley game, that the children...

user profile pic

lucy4peanut | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted March 4, 2010 at 4:35 PM via web

dislike 1 like

What are important quotes in chapter 4 about the Boo Radley game, that the children play?

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Quotes from Scout and Atticus!

1 Answer | Add Yours

user profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted March 4, 2010 at 8:56 PM (Answer #1)

dislike 2 like

In Chapter 4 of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, Scout, Jem, and Dill create episodes about the life of the Radley's:

It was a melancholy little drama, woven from bits and scraps of gossip and neighborhood legend:  Mrs Radley had been beautiful until she married Mr. Radleay and lost all her money.  She also lost most of her teeth, her hair and her right forefinger...Boo hit it off one night when he couldn't find any cats and squirrels to eat.

Other scenes include the sheriff, the probate judge, the boys who got into trouble, assorted townspeople, and the town gossip, Miss Stephanie Crawford. Of course, the climactic scene in which Boo strikes back at his stringent father involves the scissors; so, Jem steals into the house and takes the scissors from the sewing-machine drawer when Calpurnia's back is turned.

One day the children become so preoccupied that they do not realize the time; Atticus stops on his way home and stands on the sidewalk watching them:

'What are you playing?...What are you doing with those scissors, then?....Does this have anything to do with the Radleys?

After Atticus goes into the house, Scout tells her brother that she thinks their father is aware of what they are doing.  Jem replies that she is just "being a girl."  Scout narrates,

Atticus's arrival was the second reason I wanted to quit the game.  The first reason happened the day I rolled into the Radley front year....Someone inside the house was laughing.

This last line contributes to the children's superstitions, a motif of the novel.

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes