What is implied in Lord of the Flies when Golding says, "a stick sharpened at both ends"? Could it mean that: since a regular spear has one sharp end but one round flat end, it doesn't...

What is implied in Lord of the Flies when Golding says, "a stick sharpened at both ends"?

Could it mean that: since a regular spear has one sharp end but one round flat end, it doesn't mean pure evil whereas a stick sharpened at both ends could mean that who ever his utilising it is pure evil... is there a deeper meaning? HELP

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amy-lepore's profile pic

Posted on

The above answer is excellent.  The "stick sharpened at both ends" does manifest pure evil--Jack's.  He intends to put Ralph's head on the one end and offer it to the Beast as he and the warriors have done with the pig's head.  Jack's character has been revealed as completely dark, and as leader, he is leading the rest of the boys down the same path.  Luckily for Ralph, Samneric (the twins) have a softer heart and the fire signals the Navy ship.

sagetrieb's profile pic

Posted on

Ralph is huddled in the jungle near Castle Rock, as dusk passes. Sam and Eric, who are guarding Castle Rock under Jack's leadership, are approached by Ralph. They inform him that Jack's tribe will be out hunting him the next day, and they have "sharpened a stick at both ends." The "stick sharpened at both ends" is a reference to what they did with the Lord of the Flies, impaling one end in the head and the other in the ground. This shows the brutality of what they planned to do to Ralph, who indeed felt like a pig being hunted by the savages.

Enotes offers an excellent analysis of the novel, and the second URL I provide below is a site completely dedicated to it.

tasom's profile pic

Posted on

I'm new to this website, but we talked about this in my literature class, and it means that the one end of the stick was to stick the pigs head through, and the other end of the stick means to stick it through the ground

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