In "Speak", what happens when Melinda visits Heather on Columbus Day?What does this reveal about Heather?

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dymatsuoka's profile pic

dymatsuoka | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

On Columbus Day, Melinda goes to Heather's house to visit, at Heather's insistence.  Heather wants the two of them to be in the school musical, but Melinda says that she doesn't think that will happen.  Heather complains, "it's not fair", and begins to cry and carry on.  After awhile, she calms down and apologizes, blaming her outburst on PMS.  She then begins to make plans, determining that she and Melinda should "work (their) way into a good group...(and) make them like (them)".  Melinda thinks this "is the most hopeless idea (she) has ever heard", and, repulsed by "(so) much emotion", leaves without saying goodbye.

Heather is revealed to be a spoiled young girl who is used to getting what she wants.  She is something of a drama queen, and is not above throwing a tantrum when frustrated.  Although she has many nice things, she has little regard for them, spilling her nailpolish on the carpet and wiping her nose on her stuffed bear's plaid scarf.  Heather proclaims that Melinda is "the only person (she) can trust", but the depth of her friendship is questionable.  She is completely self-absorbed and does a lot of talking and very little listening.  Heather's ambition is to be accepted by a popular crowd, and her behavior is ample evidence that when push comes to shove, her own objectives will come before the welfare of anyone else ("Acting").

angelalee3's profile pic

angelalee3 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) Honors

Posted on

At Heather's house on Columbus Day, Heather shows how self-centered she is through her behavior and conversation. Melinda spills nail polish on the carpet and doesn't make a big deal out of it, because things don't mean as much to her as they do to Heather. Heather is willing to do nearly anything to be accepted by the popular crowd. Melinda doesn't understand the appeal of being popular.

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