What happens at the end of The Giver? Any proof?Please add proof!! (page numbers)

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lorrainecaplan's profile pic

Lorraine Caplan | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I am guessing that you wonder whether Jonas and Gabriel live or die at the end of the story. There is support for either interpretation, but the author has said,

I am surprised when some people tell me they think the boy and the baby die.  I don't think they die (Lowry, 6, in "Conversation with Lois Lowry," which can be found at the end of some editions of The Giver).

The very last section of the book speaks of Jonas on the sled, afraid he is losing consciousness as he and Gabe start down the hill.  He sees what appear to be Christmas lights through the windows of houses below, where families "celebrated love" (178). He believes that the people below are waiting for him and Gabe and hears people singing. 

This suggests that either Jonas and Gabe are approaching a real town where they will be taken in and loved, or that Jonas and Gabe, who are in deplorable physical condition, are about to die and Jonas is seeing a glimpse of heaven,  where he and  Gabe will find light, warmth, music, and love. 

Since the author has already said that the children do not die, the second interpretation, as it exists only in the story, has some basis in the text, but is not supported because the author has told us so. 

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

We know for sure that Jonas and Gabe leave the community at the end of the book.  Jonas finds the sled that was in the memory that The Giver gave him.  He uses it to sled down the hill toward the village.

We know this stuff.  What I'm not sure of is what kind of speculation you are looking for.

We can assume, for example, that as Jonas leaves, all of the memories The Giver gave him will be released back into the community.  We know this because when Rosemary was released all of her memories were released and people felt them.

Feel free to clarify...

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