Homework Help

What is a good theme for The Hunger Games?

user profile pic

livclean | Student, Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted March 29, 2010 at 1:24 PM via web

dislike 4 like

What is a good theme for The Hunger Games?

45 Answers | Add Yours

user profile pic

slchanmo1885 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted April 19, 2010 at 3:18 AM (Answer #1)

dislike 32 like

One of the most prevalent themes in The Hunger Games is survival, and keeping your humanity and dignity as you try to survive. Katniss and Peeta must survive the games of course, but they also must survive their daily lives in the district. The capitol has made life incredibly difficult for those living in the districts, and to survive the lack of food and adequate necessities requires great strength of spirit. Some people in the districts give up, and others manage to survive but become heartless or mentally unstable. Katniss is a true survivor, she pulls her family through the tough time after her father's death, when otherwise they would not have survived. Katniss' mother is one of the ones who gives up, and becomes mentally unstable when her husband dies. Katniss realizes that she must stay strong and in control in order to keep her family alive. She continues this practice during the Hunger Games. During Katniss and Peeta's training, Peeta tells Katniss that if he dies in the arena, he wants to do it with his dignity intact. Peeta knows that chances of survival are slim, but if he can die as himself, with his humanity and dignity in place, he can face death. In other years of the games, people had gone insane or become incredibly violent and homicidal, eating competitor's hearts and doing unspeakable things in order to survive. Peeta is not willing to compromise his humanity, and would rather die with dignity. 

user profile pic

smurf824 | Middle School Teacher | Salutatorian

Posted April 3, 2010 at 11:36 AM (Answer #2)

dislike 6 like

I actually just finished reading this novel not too long ago.  I think that you could read quite a bit into this story, depending on which character's perspective you are coming from.  THere's the idea of building relationships and allowing yourself to trust in your friends.  There is the theme of kharma and treating others the way you wish to be treated.  The main character remembers how the boy (sorry I can't remember names off the top of my head) treated her when she was little and so in turn she helps him.  Then if you look at it on a larger level, there are the political themes, tying to them revolting against the 'powerful government' and standing up for what they believe is right; the little girl did so for her sister, and they did at the end when they refused to kill one another.

user profile pic

ashwren | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted June 12, 2011 at 4:41 AM (Answer #3)

dislike 4 like

There are a few themes that can represent the Hunger Games. The easiest to see is, of course, survival. The tributes fight against each other and the elements to survive the games. And the citizens of the districts fight to survive their daily lives where. In the later books this theme continues.

A further look could focus on human rights and equality of citizens. Citizens of the Capitol have every luxury and do not have to choose tributes to fight in the games. And the districts who normally win the games are rewarded with regular supplies. Other districts, like Katniss's District 12, are constantly faced with shortages. This could be taken farther to explore different types of governments. This as well is further developed later in books. You even compare current events in the Middle East to events in the last book.

user profile pic

deem1510 | Student, Grade 9 | Honors

Posted December 27, 2011 at 12:09 PM (Answer #4)

dislike 3 like

I believe one of the most prevalent themes of The Hunger Games is a theme of the power struggle among people in the capitol, such as Snow or Coin (who's name, by the way, is no coincidence). This major theme is most easily compared to "Julius Cesar". It is a theme of power and downfall. Depending on what grade you're in you could look more deeply in to the political aspect, and provide a very concise summary of the possible political views of Susanne Collins that she was trying to convey. You could really deep into this by offering another idea, possibly as your thesis to grab attention if it's going to be completely about major themes.

 

Of course I'm assuming that its an essay, which its probably not... well I hope I helped anyways.

user profile pic

cupcakegirl123 | Student, Grade 10 | Honors

Posted March 16, 2012 at 10:19 PM (Answer #5)

dislike 3 like

Friendship, survival, death, romance, power, humanity/inhumanity, unity, risk, fear

user profile pic

James Kelley | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted January 19, 2012 at 8:45 AM (Answer #6)

dislike 1 like

As I was reading the first novel in the triology, I kept thinking about Survivor, Big Brother, and any number of other hugely popular televised series from the last couple of decades. Any number of possible themes might emerge from that comparison: To what extent is entertainment also exploitation? Why do we seem to be so obsessed with the idea of surveillance and the widespread broadcasting of images? What are the connections between power and propoganda? Or the differences between alliances and friendships?

The other two novels in the series really continue to develop the idea that image is everything (or, to use fancier terms, what we call reality is itself a construct,) so I'm going to go with that as a theme that hasn't been stated yet in this discussion. The reader learns that nearly all of the main characters (is Peeta the exception?) is concerned with how their image or someone else's image is coming across and what effect it might have on the general population. (Some details in the books really work well in this theme, such as the recurring use of the language of film editing. The whole "Mockingjay" costume thing in the third novel struck me as a little too much like a comic-book superhero, though, but it certainly also works with this theme.)

user profile pic

afajen | High School Teacher | eNoter

Posted February 27, 2012 at 12:28 AM (Answer #7)

dislike 1 like

When I teach The Hunger Games I am sure to check on themes of power, respect and sacrifice.  Each of these carries through the novel and is well-developed.

user profile pic

kimbers-indo | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted March 12, 2012 at 7:29 AM (Answer #8)

dislike 1 like

Media control and manipulation certainly feature as themes, particularly as correlated with the government's use of same as a form of repression. I am not sure that Suzanne Collins mounts the same intellectually compelling argument against government control as in novels like 1984 but the story is a good read for a YA audience and will certainly have people questioning things like reality/competitive TV (Big Brother, ... Got Talent, the Idol shows) and the cult of celebrity. I liked the parts in District 1 before the Games began about the machinations of stylists and TV hosts. 

   The parallels with ancient Rome are interesting; the 'circus' as diversion for the masses compares with 'the hunger games', the triumphant progress of games victors after the event matches with Rome's triumphs for her generals. And Collins even sprinkles a number of Roman names through district one.

user profile pic

willie000 | Student, Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted June 23, 2012 at 8:46 PM (Answer #9)

dislike 1 like

One of the main established themes in The Hunger Games is continued survival, and maintaining your compassion and pride while you try to survive. Katniss and Peeta must stay alive in the games of course, must as well continue living to endure their every day lives in the district. The capitol has made living unbelievably easier said than done for individuals living in the districts, and to survive  being short of food and enough supplies requires enormous power of strength. Some citizens in the districts offer up, and others manage to survive but become cold-blooded or psychologically not fixed. In additional years of the sports competition the community had gone crazy or become extremely aggressive and murderous. Eating competitor's hearts and doing terrifying things in order to stay alive. Peeta is not willing to compromise his civilization, and would somewhat die with self-respect. The Hunger Games are full of sacrifices. Katniss makes a giant individual sacrifice when she takes her sister's position within the Hunger Games. She and Peeta sacrifice themselves for every other at the ending of the Games while they pop the berries in their mouth. Katniss and Peeta are eager to die as one. Or they would have, if the broadcaster hadn't stopped them. Sacrifices create a big collision since they remind us that human life means something. In a world of truth activity similar to the Hunger Games, that can be a very powerful thing.


user profile pic

jasonsandoval39 | Student, Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted September 20, 2011 at 8:01 AM (Answer #10)

dislike 0 like

A good theme for the story could be Love and Friendship because of the Love that Peeta has for Katniss and the Friendship that Katniss has with Rue

user profile pic

linash-12ts | Student | eNoter

Posted April 4, 2012 at 9:50 PM (Answer #12)

dislike 0 like

The most powerful theme is friendship, how you should really trust your allies and help them when they are in great need, like Katniss and Rue. It is about how during survival, you can actually form friendships. 

user profile pic

cookie-lover818 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 11, 2012 at 3:41 AM (Answer #13)

dislike 0 like

action, survival, friendship, and not letting the Capital just make you "part of their games" as Peeta says in the first book the night before the first games.

user profile pic

kc7092 | High School Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted May 25, 2012 at 7:39 AM (Answer #14)

dislike 0 like

The Hunger Games Theme of Power

 
 

Well, the main source of power in The Hunger Games is clear: the totalitarian government of the Capitol. Because the Capitol holds most of the country of Panem’s wealth, the government there is able to control the people in all of the districts across Panem. The Hunger Games, then, are the ultimate display of the government’s power and were designed to warn the populace against rebellion. In the Hunger Games, the citizens of Panem become nothing more than pawns in an elaborate game of life or death. Since only one teenage contestant, or "tribute," can win, the tributes are forced to kill teens from the other districts and one from their own district. It's all symbolic of how the Capitol prevents the people in the districts from joining forces and rebelling – the Games keep the people of the districts divided and fighting among themselves. Worst of all, the government broadcasts the event live on television, reinforcing the idea that the tributes are giving their lives for little more than the entertainment of the Capitol.

Let’s not forget, though, that this book is also about ways to resist the kind of power that the Capitol represents. While the people of Panem might not have the Capitol’s money, they do have other ways of fighting back. Remember when District 12 gives Katniss their salute? Or when Katniss covers Rue’s dead body in flowers? These symbolic gestures call attention to the fact that there are actual people in the Hunger Games – real live humans, not just game pieces. In that sense, these small moments of defiance can be very powerful.

 

user profile pic

kc7092 | High School Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted May 25, 2012 at 7:41 AM (Answer #15)

dislike 0 like

The Hunger Games Theme of Versions of Reality

 
 

Ah, reality television: The Bachelor, The Biggest Loser, Jersey Shore.Don’t we just love it? The people of Panem, the fictional country of The Hunger Games, also watch lots of reality television, except there’s only one show they watch. It’s called the Hunger Games. Instead of contestants losing a bunch of weight or marrying a total stranger, the show is about a group of teenagers who (wait for it) kill each other in a fight to the death.

Yup, you heard us. Death.

The Hunger Games, then, asks us to think about all of the different versions of reality at play in the novel – and their consequences. What’s real and what’s not real in the Hunger Games? These are the questions we’ll be grappling with, along with the characters in the novel, throughout the series. (Be sure to head over to "Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory" for more on reality TV.)

user profile pic

kc7092 | High School Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted May 25, 2012 at 7:45 AM (Answer #16)

dislike 0 like

The Hunger Games Theme of Identity

 
 

Before the Hunger Games, Katniss Everdeen was a hunter and gatherer in District 12 in the country of Panem. She didn’t much like cats, though she loved her sister very much. Her main goal was always the survival of her family. After being put in front of the Hunger Games’ cameras, though, things get kind of complicated. Katniss must craft a persona that will sell herself to the audiences at home – and to potential sponsors. Thrown into a world where image is everything, she has to play a whole new (boy crazy) Katniss on camera. But will this brand new Katniss last? Is this really her? What identity awaits her when she returns to District 12?

 

The Hunger Games Theme of Society and Class

 

The Hunger Games is a novel about the "haves" and the "have nots" – that is, the people who have money and the people who don't. The Capitol has money. Gobs of it. While the Capitol is wealthier than all of the districts, some districts are more privileged than others, so they can train their tributes to do well in the Hunger Games – a competition they see as a way to gain glory and fame. The poor districts? Well, not much of an advantage there. District 12, Katniss's district, is an impoverished coal mining region that never stands a chance in the Games. They view the Games as a punishment that must be endured – something that robs them of their children. The novel asks you, then, to think about how money can change things for you – and change how you see the world.

 

The Hunger Games Theme of Love

 

Hey, everyone. Meet Katniss: the girl who cannot love. Katniss has spent her whole life just trying to survive and because of that she does not, repeat, does not get attached to people. There is this one boy, though, named Gale that she kinda sorta likes. Then there's Peeta who she's just pretending to be in love with. Right? Hm. Sounds like it could get complicated.

Oh, and wait. There's another problem too. love is a battlefield.sure, but we also learn that in the Hunger Games romance can be a really great way to survive on the battlefield. By snogging on her co-tribute Peeta, Katniss is able to score support and gifts from her sponsors. Unfortunately, none of this helps Katniss figure out how she really feels.

 
user profile pic

kc7092 | High School Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted May 25, 2012 at 7:47 AM (Answer #17)

dislike 0 like

 

 
 

The Hunger Games Theme of Strength and Skill

 
In the Hunger Games, each candidate has his or her own set of skills and strengths. There's Cato, who has a crazy temper and can snap someone's neck with his bare hands. There's Foxface, the craftiest girl in the whole game. Oh, and let's not forget little Rue who can jump from tree to tree. And, of course, Peeta is a master of camouflage. Then there's our heroine, Katniss, who is amazing with a bow and arrow. She also has a rebellious streak a mile wide, one that impresses the Gamemakers during training. Just like in life, everyone has some kind of strength or skill all their own. What combination of strengths and skills will it take to win the Hunger Games? What is it that really makes someone strong inside of the arena – and out?

The Hunger Games Theme of Appearances

 

Welcome to the Hunger Games, a world of celebrity where image iseverything. A former hayseed, Katniss must now be concerned with how people in the cosmopolitan Capitol perceive her. Katniss will learn that manipulating her persona and public image can be a powerful thing. As such, she is assigned a whole team of beauty technicians and a fabulous stylist named Cinna who will help her carefully craft the perfect look for all of the Hunger Games televised events. Will changing Katniss's physical appearance change who she really is? Or how she feels? Can Katniss really walk the tightrope between how things look and how they really are? Or will she come crashing down?

 

 

user profile pic

kc7092 | High School Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted May 25, 2012 at 7:50 AM (Answer #18)

dislike 0 like

The Hunger Games Theme of Politics

 
 

The government of Panem is a totalitarian one, which means that it has absolute power over its people. (Nazi Germany is a good example of a totalitarian government.) Yup, that's right. The government has total and complete control over every part of its citizens' lives, and the citizens get absolutely no say about any of it. No voting, no elections, no nothing. Any kind of rebellion is a HUGE no-no, and we learn that the Capitol set up the Hunger Games to remind people of that. Lots of the book, then, is about what it is like to live in a society where you've got to struggle to have any kind of voice at all, and speaking your mind could get you killed.

 

The Hunger Games Theme of Competition

 

Well, the Hunger Games are a totally different kind of competition – one of life and death. And a game that people are forced into. What, then, does it take to win a competition like this? And can you ever really win a game like the Hunger Games? Are the Games ever really over?

The Hunger Games Theme of Sacrifice

 
 

The Hunger Games are just full of sacrifices. Katniss makes a huge personal sacrifice when she takes her sister's place in the Hunger Games. She and Peeta sacrifice themselves for each other at the end of the Games when they pop the berries in their mouth. Katniss and Peeta are willing to die together. Or they would have, if the announcer hadn't stopped them. Sacrifices make a big impact because they remind us that human life means something. In a world of reality entertainment like the Hunger Games, that can be a very powerful thing.

 
user profile pic

grush249 | Student, Grade 10 | Honors

Posted June 12, 2012 at 7:26 AM (Answer #19)

dislike 0 like

The Hunger Games focuses on the tyrrany brought about in the ruling/governing class of society with the dwindeling of basic resources including that of a moral nature. The power enjoyed is the power secured, with no conscience to consult in this particular case. Survival of the fittest is a strong theme for the Hunger Games.

It simultaneously displays a contrast of the above mentioned by love, sacrifice and even co-dependance through its main characters. Where the common district subjects skid into lives of oppression, love for Prim trumps Katniss' survival instict, showning a sappling of hope in mundane cold hearted society. Similarly, Peeta and Katniss refuse to succumb to the authorities' submissive motives and chose a death of love, clean conscience and pride as opposed to a life of cold blood on their conscience.

In my personal opinion, the Hunger Games also present a relatable scenario of medieval era in various parts of the world whereas the emotions, choices and exaggerated rendition of our moral dilemmas deem the book to be immortal piece of work.


This thematic analysis is an original work by me, so feel free to point out any improvements.

user profile pic

willie000 | Student, Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted June 23, 2012 at 8:36 PM (Answer #21)

dislike 0 like

One of the main established themes in The Hunger Games is continued survival, and maintaining your compassion and pride while you try to survive. Katniss and Peeta must stay alive in the games of course, must as well continue living to endure their every day lives in the district. The capitol has made living unbelievably easier said than done for individuals living in the districts, and to survive  being short of food and enough supplies requires enormous power of strength. Some citizens in the districts offer up, and others manage to survive but become cold-blooded or psychologically not fixed. In additional years of the sports competition the community had gone crazy or become extremely aggressive and murderous. Eating competitor's hearts and doing terrifying things in order to stay alive. Peeta is not willing to compromise his civilization, and would somewhat die with self-respect. 

Sources:

user profile pic

willie000 | Student, Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted June 23, 2012 at 8:46 PM (Answer #22)

dislike 0 like

One of the main established themes in The Hunger Games is continued survival, and maintaining your compassion and pride while you try to survive. Katniss and Peeta must stay alive in the games of course, must as well continue living to endure their every day lives in the district. The capitol has made living unbelievably easier said than done for individuals living in the districts, and to survive  being short of food and enough supplies requires enormous power of strength. Some citizens in the districts offer up, and others manage to survive but become cold-blooded or psychologically not fixed. In additional years of the sports competition the community had gone crazy or become extremely aggressive and murderous. Eating competitor's hearts and doing terrifying things in order to stay alive. Peeta is not willing to compromise his civilization, and would somewhat die with self-respect. The Hunger Games are full of sacrifices. Katniss makes a giant individual sacrifice when she takes her sister's position within the Hunger Games. She and Peeta sacrifice themselves for every other at the ending of the Games while they pop the berries in their mouth. Katniss and Peeta are eager to die as one. Or they would have, if the broadcaster hadn't stopped them. Sacrifices create a big collision since they remind us that human life means something. In a world of truth activity similar to the Hunger Games, that can be a very powerful thing.

user profile pic

rnstern | High School Teacher | eNoter

Posted July 15, 2012 at 1:35 AM (Answer #23)

dislike 0 like
The Dangers of Totalitarianism - This is a clear theme in the novel as President Snow wields so much power and evil ensues
user profile pic

tonyz98 | Student, Grade 10 | Salutatorian

Posted August 22, 2012 at 1:17 AM (Answer #24)

dislike 0 like

survival

user profile pic

tonyz98 | Student, Grade 10 | Salutatorian

Posted August 22, 2012 at 1:17 AM (Answer #25)

dislike 0 like

sacrifice

user profile pic

tonyz98 | Student, Grade 10 | Salutatorian

Posted August 22, 2012 at 1:17 AM (Answer #26)

dislike 0 like

wit

user profile pic

tonyz98 | Student, Grade 10 | Salutatorian

Posted August 22, 2012 at 1:18 AM (Answer #27)

dislike 0 like

savagery

user profile pic

sodapopjo | Student, Grade 11 | Honors

Posted August 26, 2012 at 1:11 AM (Answer #28)

dislike 0 like

Anything stemming from relationship, survival, dignity, human rights, big brother, self-preservation, love, sacrifice, humanity, trust, power, identity, competition, totalitarianism, dystopia, reality, society.

user profile pic

yalesmom | eNoter

Posted August 28, 2012 at 8:13 PM (Answer #29)

dislike 0 like

One of the more "out there" themes we will look into is reality television.  Most people claim they wouldn't actually want to watch the Hunger Games taking place, but how far from that are we?  Even in America's Funniest Home Videos, the bigger the hurt, the bigger the laugh.

user profile pic

sacchariferouscockatiel | Student, Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted September 30, 2012 at 5:25 PM (Answer #30)

dislike 0 like

If you singularly look at the first book of the series, or really any of the books individually, the best way to put the theme is it being one of the importance of sacrifice and doing what it takes to survive, no more and no less.

If you are talking about the triology as a whole, the theme can be seen as the unfairness of life. There is also a bit of an anti-vengence and anti-government undertone

user profile pic

minjoo98 | Student, Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted October 9, 2012 at 6:06 AM (Answer #31)

dislike 0 like

I think a key theme for Hunger Games is "dystopia" or survival.

user profile pic

redxrose13 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 11, 2012 at 9:17 AM (Answer #32)

dislike 0 like

I think that a good theme for the hunger games would be how there is stark contrast throughout the book when it comes to food. There is either none or such an over abbundance that it is ridicuously lavish and wastful. I think that Susan Collins was very smart in her use of food throughout the Hunger Games, because food is such a basic human need.

user profile pic

zozobra1 | Student | Honors

Posted December 10, 2012 at 4:52 AM (Answer #33)

dislike 0 like

I would say that Life is challenging (however, thats vague)

I think a universal theme in this novel is the people can rise above hardships even the most challenging ones. (Katniss and Peeta win the Hunger Games)

user profile pic

drrb | College Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted March 13, 2013 at 3:30 PM (Answer #39)

dislike 0 like

The themes of Hunger Games are quite challenging. Evils  and the repressive government are depicted as monsters. The writer in Hunger Games reveals  the dystopic vision of the world. Children are shown in violent circumstances. Their psychological trauma results from this. The dogs symbolize monstrous  tendencies. The struggle of survival and safety is also very much important. 

user profile pic

tilyouputmedown | Student, Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted October 23, 2013 at 9:05 AM (Answer #40)

dislike 0 like

bravery, confidence, 

user profile pic

maria-vivanco | TA , Grade 10 | Salutatorian

Posted January 26, 2014 at 4:22 AM (Answer #41)

dislike 0 like

I think a good theme for The Hunger Games would be survival and being clever/bravery. 

I find that survival would be a good theme because first off, the Hunger Games are literally games were people have to kill one another in order to win. There can only be one winner. Throughout the book, people in the Districts protect themselves and everyone around them. Katniss protects Prim and Gale and her loved ones. She hunts in order to feed her family. The districts do what they can to survive and keep well. 

During the games, all of the contestants are struggling to survive and not get killed. They all have different methods of course. Peeta for instance, first begins by joining the Careers in order to save himself and Katniss. Katniss tries to survive by being clever with food and knowing when to fight. Basically the games have to do with survival.

Another way the theme survival is portrayed is the way that Peeta and Katniss become "lovers." The audience doesn't know that they aren't actually in love with each other, however they do this to get sponsors and to have people rooting for them. The more sponsors you have, the more gifts you get in the arena. The whole love affair makes them likable. They do this in order to survive.

The way that bravery and cleverness are used are in the Games. However before that, Katniss volunteers for her sister when her sister is called during the Reaping. She puts her life at risk in order to save Prim. Katniss also shows bravery during the Games when she's fighting and all of that, but also in knowing the consequences of her actions and being clever enough in knowing what to do in the arena. Peeta shows cleverness as well when he tells everyone he is "in love" with Katniss. This gives them the advantage of the crowd and of sponsors. 

user profile pic

parama9000 | TA , Grade 11 | Valedictorian

Posted January 31, 2014 at 9:40 AM (Answer #42)

dislike 0 like

It is the survival of humanity and the survival of the humanity in humans. Often, when survivability kicks in, humanity is thrown out and there is rapid degradation in our actions from civilized to savages. Due to this, Katniss struggles with true love and on-screen love, struggles to come to terms to people whom she grows to know and associate with who sacrifice themselves for the ultimate usage of herself as the Mockingjay. Also it shows  the attempt to create a utopia ends up being a dystopia. It is not that obvious as to how the people of the Capitol got to their places and the society depicted in the books are originally formed, but from the last book, Katniss speculates if there were a group of "victors" long ago that sat at a round table to discuss the fate of the "evil" beings, the people of the districts at that time, which culminated in the creation of the Hunger Games. This could also be a central theme as to the series from the fact that the rebellion was lead by District 13's head, whose district was the one who "ceased to exist"when the districts were losing, and then suddenly at the top leading, but grabbing the power after the fighting, after the war efforts from all OTHER districts had been successful. In the climb for Utopia, there are people with the same goal for different motives, and this is what Katniss finally realizes at the very end of the series. This, I think would be the main, core, central theme of the book, that the attempt at Utopia always falls to dystopia.

user profile pic

Wiggin42 | TA , Grade 11 | Valedictorian

Posted April 26, 2014 at 9:38 PM (Answer #43)

dislike 0 like

The cruelty of human nature is another good theme for The Hunger Games. People will go to any extent to survive. Peeta's mother scolds him for giving burnt food away. The "careers" fight in a bloodthirsty manner and fight of their own will for the fame and fortune. That society has lost sight of what matters the most and is a reflection of the cruelty of human nature. 

user profile pic

udonbutterfly | TA , College Freshman | Valedictorian

Posted June 30, 2014 at 1:05 AM (Answer #44)

dislike 0 like

A great theme for the Hunger Games could be survival and sacrafice. From the time Katniss was 11 she had to sacrifice her own safety in order to feed her family and have them survive while her mother just wasn't able to cope with the death of their father. Another point could be that could be used is that in order for her family to stay intact she volunteered herself to into the Games instead of her sister. Now it is my opinion that when Katniss became close to Rue, and her protective instincts awoke, the relativity of survival hit her hard and she stop playing defense sacrificed what morals she had and basically killed. Also with her sacrificing her morals she lead the public to believe she was a helpless romantic, which we all knew she wasn't, in order to survive and make it out of the games. She even sacrificed her life to survive, I'm referring to the part in the book where Peter and herself are about to eat the poisonous berries.

user profile pic

zumba96 | TA , Grade 11 | Valedictorian

Posted June 30, 2014 at 1:07 AM (Answer #45)

dislike 0 like

A major theme is survival but also not to give up. Once Katniss knew her sister was going to be in the Hunger Games, she knew her chance of survival was slim and even without that, there was no way she'd let anything happen to her sister and she volunteered for tribute. Throughout the entire Hunger Games, it was full of techniques regarding survival and whether it was the hornets, the gas, lack of food, or the crazed animals near the end, it was all about surviving. All the tributes were in it to win it and to win it meant to survive, with one survivor. 

user profile pic

crystaltu001 | TA , Grade 10 | Valedictorian

Posted July 1, 2014 at 10:23 PM (Answer #46)

dislike 0 like

A good theme for the Hunger Games is " Brains over Brawn" because using your wit, you make overcome strength and muscle.

user profile pic

lv1997 | eNoter

Posted July 5, 2014 at 1:40 AM (Answer #47)

dislike 0 like

Survival, death, romance, power, humanity/inhumanity, and unity are main themes in "The Hunger Games"

user profile pic

v-v-jacks0n-v-v | Student, Grade 10 | eNoter

Posted September 25, 2011 at 2:45 AM (Answer #34)

dislike -2 like

The characters despite having to fight each other for resources and for survival they still work together in aliances. This, unfortunately, in these situations will always end with human instinct of the requirement of elimanating the competition and in this case turning on your allies.

user profile pic

akuhano | Student, Grade 11 | Salutatorian

Posted August 10, 2011 at 12:34 PM (Answer #35)

dislike -3 like

The major themes in The Hunger Games, as noted by a VOYA reviewer, are "government control, 'big brother', and personal independence".Survival and self-preservation are also apparent.

user profile pic

lahlhtlwa | Student, Grade 9 | Honors

Posted November 8, 2011 at 7:58 AM (Answer #36)

dislike -4 like

Nobody can control you except yourself.

user profile pic

puppiesrawesemz | Student, Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted January 4, 2012 at 9:05 AM (Answer #37)

dislike -4 like

The theme of the story based on how much I read, would probably be something like action, or adventure

user profile pic

penguin101 | eNoter

Posted January 5, 2012 at 7:12 AM (Answer #38)

dislike -4 like

I think a good theme for the story would be like something about the fight for independence since after they won the hunger games a revolution happens maybe a theme about a fight for independence and their people

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes