Homework Help

What is the falling action in "The Interlopers"?

wordperfect88's profile pic

Posted via web

dislike 0 like

What is the falling action in "The Interlopers"?

3 Answers | Add Yours

Top Answer

clairewait's profile pic

Posted (Answer #1)

dislike 1 like

I think one of the best parts of this story, is that the "falling action" is left out and therefore purposefully ambiguous (open to reader interpretation).  The story ends quite abruptly at the climax.  Ulrich and Georg, long time generational enemies, have at last, in their life-threatening predicament, become friends.  Calling out together for help shows that they have embraced the idea of unifying.  When they see figures in the distance, then, they believe for a moment (together) that they are saved.  Until:

"No," said Ulrich with a laugh, the idiotic chattering laugh of a man unstrung with hideous fear.

"Who are they?" asked Georg quickly, straining his eyes to see what the other would gladly not have seen.

"Wolves."

This is where the story ends.  In addition to the surprise ending (which is a great example of situational irony), the author leaves the fate of the two men untold.  The audience is left to their imaginations.  Like the original (and arguably better) horror movies, showing and telling less actually produces more.  The human imagination has the ability to end this tale with a much creepier and more chilling image than the author likely could have done with words.

canadarocks's profile pic

Posted (Answer #2)

dislike 0 like

I think one of the best parts of this story, is that the "falling action" is left out and therefore purposefully ambiguous (open to reader interpretation).  The story ends quite abruptly at the climax.  Ulrich and Georg, long time generational enemies, have at last, in their life-threatening predicament, become friends.  Calling out together for help shows that they have embraced the idea of unifying.  When they see figures in the distance, then, they believe for a moment (together) that they are saved.  Until:

"No," said Ulrich with a laugh, the idiotic chattering laugh of a man unstrung with hideous fear.

"Who are they?" asked Georg quickly, straining his eyes to see what the other would gladly not have seen.

"Wolves."

This is where the story ends.  In addition to the surprise ending (which is a great example of situational irony), the author leaves the fate of the two men untold.  The audience is left to their imaginations.  Like the original (and arguably better) horror movies, showing and telling lessactually produces more.  The human imagination has the ability to end this tale with a much creepier and more chilling image than the author likely could have done with words.

alix777's profile pic

Posted (Answer #3)

dislike 0 like

Best answer as selected by question asker.

I think one of the best parts of this story, is that the "falling action" is left out and therefore purposefully ambiguous (open to reader interpretation).  The story ends quite abruptly at the climax.  Ulrich and Georg, long time generational enemies, have at last, in their life-threatening predicament, become friends.  Calling out together for help shows that they have embraced the idea of unifying.  When they see figures in the distance, then, they believe for a moment (together) that they are saved.  Until:

"No," said Ulrich with a laugh, the idiotic chattering laugh of a man unstrung with hideous fear.

"Who are they?" asked Georg quickly, straining his eyes to see what the other would gladly not have seen.

"Wolves."

This is where the story ends.  In addition to the surprise ending (which is a great example of situational irony), the author leaves the fate of the two men untold.  The audience is left to their imaginations.  Like the original (and arguably better) horror movies, showing and telling lessactually produces more.  The human imagination has the ability to end this tale with a much creepier and more chilling image than the author likely could have done with words.

 

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes