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To what extent would raising brain dead chicken be ethical?André Ford, an architecture...

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thello | Student, Undergraduate | Honors

Posted September 10, 2012 at 5:05 PM via web

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To what extent would raising brain dead chicken be ethical?

André Ford, an architecture student from the U.K proposed his 'Headless Chicken Solution" for a project at the Royal College of Art in which he was asked to look for sustainable solutions to the U.K.'s farming inefficiencies.

These chickens are typically raised in overcrowded, dark rooms. After they've grown for a few weeks, they go through a process in which an automated machines cuts their throats before dipping them in scalding water to remove feathers. But the method is imperfect, and some chickens are still conscious when dipped, while some of them miss the throat-cutter entirely.

Ford's idea is to spare chickens pain and suffering while maximizing space and production capability at the same time.

The science is simple: remove the chicken's cerebral cortex and thus remove its sense perception.

Some countries interested with the idea of this factory. Because it also make possible to buy chicken cheaper and help childrens who has some trouble with luck of food.

What do you think about this? 

9 Answers | Add Yours

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted September 10, 2012 at 5:40 PM (Answer #2)

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I do not think this would be unethical.  If we are already raising an animal solely for the purpose of killing it and eating it, there seems to be no problem with taking away its senses during its life time.  In a way, this could even be more ethical in that we do not subject the animal to pain and suffering during its lifetime.  

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e-martin | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted September 10, 2012 at 5:58 PM (Answer #3)

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To answer the opening question directly, it seems that this practice would be ethical insofar as it kept the animals from feeling pain. If there is the additional benefit of making this product more affordable for low income families, that would be another mark under the column "ethical".

However, I expect many people would think that this treatment of animals is a sort of abomination. To posit the "headless" chicken option as the only alternative to the "norm" of this factory creates a false choice. There are other options available besides brain removal. 

 

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mwalter822 | Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted September 10, 2012 at 10:34 PM (Answer #4)

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It's hard for me to imagine a scenario in which this is truly "ethical." It's also hard for me to imagine not doing it if it would help feed hungry people. I hate the idea of mistreating animals and I hate the idea of hungry people.

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wannam | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted September 13, 2012 at 2:30 PM (Answer #5)

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Perhaps this would be ethical.  It might even be considered more humane for the animals since it would help them avoid pain.  However, I wonder if it is even feasible.  Can a chicken survive long enough to be harvested without that portion of its brain?  I supose the cerebral cortex doesn't control any bodily functions, but I wonder what removing the sesory perception would actually do to the chicken's ability to live.  I think many would argue that it is still cruel.  It would be ethical in terms of business ethics but I think many would argue whether it is morally ethical.

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thello | Student , Undergraduate | Honors

Posted September 24, 2012 at 4:47 PM (Answer #6)

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I think it would be ethical. Becaue as long as their brain stem is intact, their homeostatic functions will continue to operate. By removing the cerebral cortex of the chicken, its sensory perceptions are removed. It can be produced in a denser condition while remaining alive, and oblivious. This leads to help people who is uffering from poverty.

Also in normal farm (not brain dead one),chickens spend their 6-7week lives in windowless sheds, each containing around 40,000 birds. Green or blue artificial 
lighting is on for a maximum 23.5hrs/day to encourage consumption. Because these chickens feel stress so they put coloured light which has a calming effect on the birds for reduces cannibalism-eating each other.

And nowadays, these Broiler chickens are selectively bred to encourage positive traits such as rapid growth and high grain to muscle tissue (meat) yield efficiency. They grow faster than they would naturally gaining 90 grams a day, which often causes skeletal problems and lameness.

Many die due to the inability of birds’ hearts and lungs to keep up with their rapid growth.There is 5% mortality rate in intensive systems; Worldwide each year, 45 million birds die or are humanely culled before they reach the processing plant.  However, demand for chicken is rising and methods of production will need to intensify in order to meet this increase.

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted September 24, 2012 at 11:53 PM (Answer #7)

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I had never heard of this, but you raise an interesting question. I don't think this is ethical. It is true that the chicken does not experience pain, but it does not experience life either. There is something gruesome about this. Let the chickens roam free and live healthy lives, then kill them and eat them.
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thello | Student , Undergraduate | Honors

Posted September 25, 2012 at 3:35 PM (Answer #8)

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>There is something gruesome about this. Let the chickens roam free and live healthy lives, then kill them and eat them.

Yes, this is good for the chickens but how about peoples who is suffering from poverty? Every day 240,000 children killed by poverty.  Chicken is popular than the beef or porks because, most of the religions able to have chicken but can not have pork or beefs. e.g.  Hindooism, Muslim (religion of Isram)...etc.

Well, the best way is all of us will be vegetarian.

But I know it is hard and I do not think it will help the childrens in Africa.

 

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thello | Student , Undergraduate | Honors

Posted September 25, 2012 at 3:36 PM (Answer #9)

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I had never heard of this, but you raise an interesting question. I don't think this is ethical. It is true that the chicken does not experience pain, but it does not experience life either. There is something gruesome about this. Let the chickens roam free and live healthy lives, then kill them and eat them.

>There is something gruesome about this. Let the chickens roam free and live healthy lives, then kill them and eat them.

Yes, this is good for the chickens but how about peoples who is suffering from poverty? Every day 240,000 children killed by poverty. Chicken is popular than the beef or porks because, most of the religions able to have chicken but can not have pork or beefs. e.g. Hindooism, Muslim (religion of Isram)...etc. Well, the best way is all of us will be vegetarian. But I know it is hard and I do not think it will help the childrens in Africa.

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thello | Student , Undergraduate | Honors

Posted November 6, 2012 at 4:44 PM (Answer #10)

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7billions of peoples living on the earth but every year, consumers in rich countries waste almost as much food (222 million metric tons) which possible to male 12billions people eat enough food in a year. If we reduce waste, it will help the children from poverty. Then this BDC will not be needed.

but do u think all the citizens can save the food?

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