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what is the effect of a change in narration from Victor to the monster? support and...

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aboveauthority02 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted August 24, 2010 at 2:48 PM via web

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what is the effect of a change in narration from Victor to the monster? support and explain an example

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scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted August 29, 2010 at 4:58 AM (Answer #2)

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When the Monster finally gets the chance to tell his side of the story, readers begin to sympathize with him and to dislike Victor even more. He becomes human, and it is difficult to think of him as a "monster" or "creature." When I teach Frankenstein, the monster's narration is usually the section of the book that draws in even the most reluctant reader.

When the monster begins to speak, readers wonder where he learned his eloquent language and how he found Victor; so not only does his narration illustrate his humanity, it also builds suspense.

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sdhildreth12 | eNotes Newbie

Posted August 30, 2010 at 5:51 PM (Answer #3)

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When the creature is hung over his creator, Frankenstein, at the end of the novel, The reader can tend to see that even though he destroyed Victor and his family (through the murders of William, his wife and Justine) he is very emotional for the loss of his creator.  It raises the question who was more sympathetic, Victor or the creature?  Even though the creature did kill Frankensteins dearest family  he was not very sympathetic himself.  Victor from the beginning deserted the creature leaving him to learn life completely on his on.  The creatures only request was to have some he could share life with, which he never had.  Victor judged his creation on his horrifying looks even though the creature only reached out to victor like a baby would reach for its mother. When the monster narrates the story, we see it from a different more agonizing point of view. "That is also my victim" he exclaimed (the creature): "in his murder my crimes are consummated; the miserable series of my being is wound to close! Oh, Frankenstein! generous and self-devoted being! what does it avail that I now ask thee to pardon me? I, who irretrievably destroyed thee by destroying all thou lovedst. Alas, he is cold he cannot answer me." (Shelly 216)

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sdhildreth12 | eNotes Newbie

Posted August 30, 2010 at 5:55 PM (Answer #4)

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When the Monster finally gets the chance to tell his side of the story, readers begin to sympathize with him and to dislike Victor even more. He becomes human, and it is difficult to think of him as a "monster" or "creature." When I teach Frankenstein, the monster's narration is usually the section of the book that draws in even the most reluctant reader.

When the monster begins to speak, readers wonder where he learned his eloquent language and how he found Victor; so not only does his narration illustrate his humanity, it also builds suspense.

Yes he does hate his creator during the course of the novel but after he realizes that his creator has died, the mood of the creature changes drastically

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted November 23, 2010 at 8:21 AM (Answer #5)

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The narration by the creature is so poignant that the reader is touched emotionally when reading it, whereas during the reading of Victor's narration, little sympathy is evoked in the reader for the man who ran from his creation and deserts his family and friends.

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