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What does the ending say concerning Orwell's attitude toward Communism and...

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billkaulitzfan13 | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted December 2, 2007 at 5:57 AM via web

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What does the ending say concerning Orwell's attitude toward Communism and Capitalism?
Do either systems treat its lower classes well in the novel?

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sagetrieb | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted December 2, 2007 at 7:59 AM (Answer #1)

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At the end of the novel, the animals looking into the window look back and forth between the pigs and the humans, and they can't tell one from the other. By this Orwelll suggests that the system the pigs started and the system the humans have been using, from the point of view of an onlooker, seem identical. The pigs now talk about the animals as "lower classes" just as the humans talk about their own "lower classes." While the animal revolution started with noble ideals, it became corrupted by the greed of its leaders, the pigs, so that it now, by the end of the book, suffers from the same class system that characterizes capitalism and which the animals originally found unfair and cruel.

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