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What does the description of Heorot, in Beowulf, say about Hrothgar's society?

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krinstine09 | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 18, 2012 at 11:36 PM via web

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What does the description of Heorot, in Beowulf, say about Hrothgar's society?

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted July 18, 2013 at 12:25 AM (Answer #1)

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Hrothgar's mead hall (Heorot), as seen in Beowulf, is defined in chapter one. Desiring to give glory to God for all of his glories in war and combat, Hrothgar decided to show God glory through the building of the hall. The hall was to be "a master mead-house," larger than ever before built.

The greatness of the hall speaks to two main things relevant in the Anglo-Saxon society. First, the great hall illustrated Hrothgar as a great king. To be able to construct such a hall, built by "many tribes throughout the earth," supports Hrothgar's renown. Second, the hall represents the society's honor of God. Although loyal to both God and king, the Anglo-Saxons desired loyalty of their society as well.

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