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What does Atticus tell Scout about the Ewells? How are the Ewells their own society?...

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classy2u | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 6, 2009 at 9:56 AM via web

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What does Atticus tell Scout about the Ewells? How are the Ewells their own society? Exlpain.

To be specific he said this in chapters 1-6. I am stumped I can't find teh answer :(

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 6, 2009 at 10:46 AM (Answer #1)

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In Chapter 3, Atticus explains to Scout that "the Ewells had been the disgrace of Maycomb for three generations" and that "none of them had done an honest day's work in his recollection." Atticus promises to take Scout to see the Ewell house one day to show her that "they lived like animals." Though public education was provided, the Ewells chose not to accept it. But Atticus adds that it "...'would be silly to force people like the Ewells into a new environment'..." for they were members of their own society--a society of Ewells. The Ewells broke the law regularly, but that was the Ewell way, and the people of Maycomb usually cast a blind eye at their activities. Like their home, which was on the wrong side of the tracks, they lived a life apart from the rest of the decent people of Maycomb.

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