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What did George do once that made him stop playing jokes on Lennie?Of Mice and Men by...

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thewild1z | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted May 26, 2011 at 9:55 AM via web

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What did George do once that made him stop playing jokes on Lennie?

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted May 26, 2011 at 4:01 PM (Answer #1)

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[Questions had to be eliminated since students are only allowed one question at a time.]

In Chapter 3 of Steinbeck's novella, Of Mice and Men, as they play cards together, George responds to Slim's "calm invitation to confidence" after Slim asks him why he and Lennie travel together.  George explains that they are from the same town, and when Lennie's Aunt Clara died, Lennie just "came along" with George.

As an afterthought, George explains  that he used to have fun with Lennie by playing practical jokes on Lennie.  But, because Lennie was so simple in his thinking, he never understood that he was being teased.  Instead, he would dumbly obey George.  In fact, Lennie was so devoted to George that George could tell him to do something harmful, and Lennie would do it.  One day, George told Lennie, who did not know how to swim, to jump into the water.  When he nearly drowned, then thanked George for getting him safely out, George never teased him again. Perhaps George recognizes in Lennie the simple yearning of all men for friendship.

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coolnoda | Student, Grade 10 | Honors

Posted May 27, 2011 at 7:21 PM (Answer #2)

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I finished the book 3 months ago... well george once told lennie to jump in the river, and as usual lennie listened to george even though he didnt know how to swim. then lennie almost drowned till george saved him , and he felt very sorry for using him just for his mental disability.

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