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What is the significance of Fort Sumter?

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monique06 | Valedictorian

Posted April 24, 2011 at 1:08 AM via web

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What is the significance of Fort Sumter?

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krcavnar | High School Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted April 24, 2011 at 1:38 AM (Answer #1)

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Fort Sumter, located in Charleston, South Carolina was one of two federal ports in the southern United States. Soon after the election of 1860 seven southern states succeeded from the Union.  President Lincoln declared that the Union would hold on to these two ports after the succession.  However, on April 10, 1861 the Confederate General Beauregard demanded evacuation of the post by the Union troops.  When they refused General Beauregard attacked Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861.  On April 13, 1861, Fort Sumter was captured by the Confederacy and on April 14, 1861 Major Robert Anderson surrendered to the Confederacy. 

In response to the capture of Fort Sumter, President Lincoln called on state militias to put down the rebellion.  This in turn caused more states to join the Confederacy. The battle for control of Fort Sumter marked the beginning of what was to become the Civil War.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted April 24, 2011 at 1:46 AM (Answer #2)

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The significance of Fort Sumter is that it is where the Civil War essentially started.  When the Union tried to resupply the fort and the South fired on the fort, the war was inevitable.

Fort Sumter was a fort in the harbor of Charleston, SC.  Even after South Carolina seceded from the Union, Pres. Lincoln declared that he would continue to keep Union troops in the fort.  The troops were eventually going to need to be resupplied.  Therefore, in April of 1861, Lincoln sent supplies to the fort.  South Carolina forces fired on the fort and finally took it.  This essentially started the Civil War.

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