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Where have all the clocks stopped in Miss Havisham's house in Great Expectations?

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baseball69 | Student, Grade 11 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted April 6, 2010 at 12:08 AM via web

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Where have all the clocks stopped in Miss Havisham's house in Great Expectations?

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missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted April 6, 2010 at 12:18 AM (Answer #1)

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In chapter 8 it says:

It was when I stood before her, avoiding her eyes, that I took note of the surrounding objects in detail, and saw that her watch had stopped at twenty minutes to nine, and that a clock in the room had stopped at twenty minutes to nine.

So, this time of 8:40 is obviously significant. If you continue to watch as you read and notice the moment at which in this home it seems time has stopped you will put together a puzzle about why this time is so important.

At this point in the story, this woman is just freaky to Pip. Her dress, her home, her desire to see a young boy at play. But hang on to these pieces!

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lit24 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted April 7, 2010 at 12:07 AM (Answer #2)

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In Ch.8 Pip first meets Miss Havisham. It is a dreadful and horrifying experience for him but his eyes observe every detail minutely and he describes very precisely every thing that he sees. He tells us that time had come to a stand still at exactly 8 hours and 40 minutes in Miss Havisham's room:

It was when I stood before her, avoiding her eyes, that I took note of the surrounding objects in detail, and saw that her watch had stopped at twenty minutes to nine, and that a clock in the room had stopped at twenty minutes to nine.

In Ch.22 Hebert explains to Pip the significance of the clock stopping at 8.40 A.M.:

The marriage day was fixed, the wedding dresses were bought, the wedding tour was planned out, the wedding guests were invited. The day came, but not the bridegroom. He wrote her a letter--"

"Which she received," I struck in, "when she was dressing for her marriage? At twenty minutes to nine?"

"At the hour and minute," said Herbert, nodding, "at which she afterwards stopped all the clocks.

Miss Havisham received Compeyson's letter at 8.40 A.M. stating that he will not marry her. So, Miss Havisham stopped all the clocks in her house at that specific moment.

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Ada Sison | Student, Grade 10 | (Level 1) Honors

Posted June 17, 2014 at 6:10 PM (Answer #4)

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All the clocks at Satis Manor are stopped at 8:40 am. 

In chapter 8, Pip observes that Miss Havisham's "watch had stopped at twenty minutes to nine" also a clock in her parlor "had stopped at twenty minutes to nine." 

In chapter 22, Herbert reveals that Miss Havisham was left at the altar by her groom (later revealed to be Compeyson), he had "wrote her a letter...broke the marriage off" which she recieved at exactly 8:40 am as she was was dressing for her wedding day.

Sources:

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parama9000 | Student, Grade 11 | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted February 28, 2014 at 3:18 PM (Answer #3)

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8.40 am

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