What are the consequences of the war in "Arms and the Man"?

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readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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The question is a bit vague, but immediately I can say these are the opening words in Vergil's Aeneid. The Latin is as follows:

Arma virumque cano... I sing of arms and the man.

These words are also an important allusion to Homer, the great Greek writer of epic. Homer wrote two works, one concerning "arms" and the other concerning "a man." The Iliad is about the great battle of arms and the Odyssey is about the great story of a man's homecoming through hardship.

If you take a step back, these three works are some of the most important works of the western canon. They speak of values that has shaped the West - Military prowess, courage, valor, glory, homecoming, etc.

The consequence for Aeneas in Vergil's Aeneid is that he established Rome, empire building. And this is exactly what the West has done for the most part.

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