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what are the conflicts in to kill a mockingbird?

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msbossy69 | Student, College Freshman | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 19, 2011 at 1:22 AM via web

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what are the conflicts in to kill a mockingbird?

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coollol | Student, Grade 10 | (Level 1) Honors

Posted December 19, 2011 at 8:01 AM (Answer #1)

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Man vs. Society: The conflict of man vs. society is basically one that deals with the prejudices, and values that the society holds. The individual that poses a different view than the society, is discriminated against, for not "flowing with the norm".

Boo Radley vs. Society: The fear of the unknown plays a major role in this 
conflict. Viewed as the town freak, the parents of the community tell stories of Boo, 
and warn their children against going near him, or even worse: becoming him. 
These stories and the curiosity built up inside every child leads Radley to be 
set off from society.

Robinson vs. White Society: As another "mockingbird", of the story, Robinson 
is wrongly accused, and loses his life due to the racism of the community. Even 
though it is obvious, to every person in the jury, that Robinson could not 
have committed the crime, and that he is an upright and religious churchgoing man, 
he is still accused of rape, and jailed.

Man vs. Man - The conflict of man vs. man is a vengeful one. The 
conflict is usually present due to a feud, disagreement with principles or 
an actual physical confrontation. It is expressed and enacted in various 
ways. This type of conflict is expressed in certain situations in this 
novel.

Bob Ewell vs. Tom Robinson - The conflict between the 
Ewells and Tom is not necessarily a direct hatred but it is a significant conflict in the story. Bob Ewell has his daughter, Mayella, accuse Tom of raping her. In truth, it was Bob who had raped and beat her. So Bob creates the conflict so he can get away with the crime. Tom is also a 
convenient and convincing "rapist" because he was at the house frequently 
and because he is black. This indirect conflict was settled in court and 
Tom was convicted of Bob' crime.

The Ewells vs. Atticus Finch - During the trial, Atticus 
was the lawyer for Tom. He proved through various examples and forms of 
evidence that Bob was guilty, not Tom. This completely, but silently, 
destroys any type of credibility that Bob possessed. He now resented 
Atticus and sought revenge on him. He took the matter into his own hands 
again and attacked the things that Atticus held most dear, his children. 
After a Halloween ball, Jem and Scout were walking home. Bob Ewell 
followed them and attacked them with a knife. If Boo Radley had not been 
there, then Jem would definitely have been killed.

 

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