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What Are The Conflict In Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde? And, If You Have Any Quotes To Support...

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jessiecarl | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 7, 2012 at 10:26 PM via web

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What Are The Conflict In Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde? And, If You Have Any Quotes To Support This Please Do!

also, if you have any information on Macbeth conflict that would be amazing.

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spikeykatt | High School Teacher | eNoter

Posted January 8, 2012 at 1:33 AM (Answer #1)

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Hi there- Stevenson uses the concept of Conflict in a number of ways.

So, there is the obvious conflict between Hyde and Jekyll, the contrast in personality and behaviour. Stevenson uses this inter-character conflict to then further raise and explore the duality of Man's nature. This therefore means that we all possess this dual personality trait as humans, that we are always in conflict with ourselves as we (usually!) behave thanks to the confines of Society. However, Stevenson suggests that actually, deep inside yourself, you also have such base desires as Hyde. It's just that thanks to the evolution of mankind over the odd millennium or two, we are better behaved and so have replaced our primordial and animalistic traits with a more civilised set of mores. To emphasise this, Stevenson has Hyde as "hirsute"; such a physical description highlights Hyde's more animalistic features/personalities and also eludes to Mankind's own and rather savage beginnings. Lots of suitable quotations, here are one or two:

"Something troglodytic..."

From The Chapter, Remarkable Incident of Dr Lanyon'-" tales came out of the man's cruelty, at once so callous and violent, of his vile life, of his strange associates..."

From Dr Lanyon's Narrative:

" but I have since had reason to believe the cause to lie much deeper in the nature of man and to turn on some nobler hinge than the principle of hatred."

There are lots within the chapter, 'Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case.'

Also, Stevenson suggests both the decline in Jekyll and the the idea of conflict in his description of the setting within the narrative.

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jessiecarl | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 9, 2012 at 2:22 AM (Answer #2)

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Hello,

Thank you for helping me out I appreciate it.

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