Homework Help

What is the concept of hell in Dr Faustus? 

user profile pic

prettygirl007 | Student, College Freshman | eNotes Newbie

Posted March 14, 2009 at 4:21 PM via web

dislike 1 like

What is the concept of hell in Dr Faustus?

 

4 Answers | Add Yours

user profile pic

ecofan74 | College Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted July 23, 2009 at 10:05 AM (Answer #1)

dislike 3 like

In Doctor Faustus, Christopher Marlowe does not present a hell where the guest list is already determined.  One's descent into hell is ultimately a voluntary decision.  Doctor Faustus, in his fervor to aspire to forbidden magical knowledge that he believes will confer power upon him, resolves to achieve it regardless of the means he must use to get it.  The curiosity and pride of man, rather than the journey to hell, is the one inevitability in Doctor Faustus.  Mephistopheles, knowing that man has this particular weakness, offers Faustus a deal which will give him the knowledge he seeks.  Mephistopheles does warn Faustus to strongly consider all of the consequences of his decision, a suggestion Faustus does not heed.

In many ways, hell and Mephistopheles, hell's emissary, are quite honorable.  One's descent into hell takes the form of a business contract, and the terms of the contract are upheld to the letter.  If anything, the concept of hell in Doctor Faustus is very much like that of a business corporation very familiar with the failings of human nature.

user profile pic

tipputhyagarajan | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Salutatorian

Posted May 15, 2010 at 12:03 AM (Answer #2)

dislike 1 like

HELL ACCORDING TO MARLOWE IS ONES OWN SELF. IT IS EXPERIENCED NOT ONLY AFTER DEATH BUT WHILE A PERSON IS STILL LIVING FOR "WHERE WE ARE IS HELL AND WHERE HELL IS THERE MUST WE EVER BE"

ACCORDING TO HIM ALIENATING ONE'S MIND FROM THE THOUGHTS OF GOD IS HELL.YOU MIGHT QUESTION ME THAT HOW IS THIS POSSIBLE SINCE MARLOWE WAS AN ATHEIST.BUT ON A DEEPER ANALYSIS OF DR FAUSTUS YOU WILL FIND THAT HE WAS STRICTLY NOT RELIGIOUS BUT HE WAS SPIRITUAL. HE SOUGHT GOD NOT OUTSIDE IN THE CHURCH BUT INSIDE IN HIS MIND.

 

user profile pic

jmichas | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted May 22, 2011 at 11:22 PM (Answer #3)

dislike 0 like

He wasn't religious

user profile pic

bettykirkers | Student, Grade 12 | TA | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted February 26, 2015 at 7:48 PM (Answer #4)

dislike 0 like

The concept of hell in Faustus contradicts the traditional idea that hell is a physical place where suffering occurs. Instead, hell is constructed as a mental state of suffering which arises from a lack of opportunity to interact with God and heaven.

Mephostophilis appears to Faustus to be on earth with him and therefore, in his mind, ‘out’ of hell. The protagonist asks: “How comes it then that thou art out of hell?” Mephostophilis’ answer clearly dismisses the idea of hell as a place which ‘bad’ individuals are constricted to:

Why, this is hell, nor am I out of it
Think’st thou that I, who saw the face of God
And tasted the eternal joys of heaven
Am not tormented with ten thousand hells
In being depriv’d of everlasting bliss?

Firstly, Mephostophilis explodes any notion of a ‘local’ hell, defining hell instead as a state of mind. The ‘hell’ that he endures on a daily basis is being deprived of ‘everlasting bliss’ and the ‘eternal joys’ that being in heaven brings.

Secondly, Mephostophilis makes it very clear that he suffers and that Faustus will too: "O Faustus, leave these frivolous demands!". Whilst Faustus disputes with Mephostophilis the metaphysics of hell, he declines to accept that he will suffer if he sells his soul to Lucifer. He exercises his fatal flaw – arrogance – and the declarative “I think hell’s a fable” epitomises his naïve nature. He underestimates the effect that the deprivation of the divine will have on him and his repeated ignorance of the good angel and, eventually, the Old Man will culminate in his demise. Faustus’ spiritual decline sees his descent into hell, as he realises the opportunity he has given up – “Damn’d art thou, Faustus, damn’d; despair and die!” – in bequeathing his soul to Lucifer for “four and twenty years” of mischief he has "lost eternal joy and felicity".

In such a way, the concept of hell is used by Marlowe to explore following the wrong path. It is also a critique of the Elizabethan attitude that hell was a physical place filled with brimstone where damned souls were banished to after death. Arguably the idea of the suffering the psyche may endure from deprivation of the divine - especially if you don't believe in the divine whilst alive - is far more chilling than any physical suffering one could be subjected to in a physical hell. 

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes