Homework Help

What is the concentration of a 450 mL solution that contains 200 grams of iron (II)...

user profile pic

steven13 | Student, Grade 9 | Honors

Posted April 2, 2011 at 6:25 AM via web

dislike 0 like

What is the concentration of a 450 mL solution that contains 200 grams of iron (II) chloride?

Tagged with chemistry, molarity, science

2 Answers | Add Yours

user profile pic

justaguide | College Teacher | (Level 2) Distinguished Educator

Posted April 2, 2011 at 9:05 PM (Answer #1)

dislike 0 like

The concentration of a solution can be expressed in terms of its molarity (M). A solution with a molarity of one has a concentration of one mole of the solute in every one liter of the solution.

Here we have a solution that contains 200 grams of iron (II) chloride in 450 mL of the solution. I have taken the iron (II) chloride to be anhydrous in nature. This has a molecular mass of 126.751 g/mole.

200 g of the compound constitutes 200/126.751 = 1.577 moles.

1.577 moles dissolved in 450 mL of the solution gives a molarity of 1.577/0.450 = 3.5

The required concentration of the 450 mL solution that contains 200 g of iron (II) chloride is 3.5 M.

user profile pic

donleonardo | Honors

Posted June 22, 2011 at 2:08 PM (Answer #2)

dislike 0 like

Moles = mass of solute/ gram molecular mass. Solute is the 'stuff being disolved. Solution is a homogeneous mixture of a solute in a solvent

.                                    moles of solute

Molarity is defined as: ____________________

.                                   liters of solution

In this problem (assuming the values given are both to 3 significant figures)

.                200g / 127 g / mol 1.57 mol

Molarity = ___________________  =  ________  = 3.50 M FeCl2

.                450mL * 1 L/1000ml            0.450 L

I ALWAYS recommended to my students that they attach the chemical formula (eg: FeCl2) as a subscript behind the unit of meaure symbol (eg: M).

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes