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What is the central conflict in the play Antigone and how is it resolved?

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sjstudent | Student, College Freshman | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 1, 2010 at 9:03 AM via web

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What is the central conflict in the play Antigone and how is it resolved?

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cetaylorplfd | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted December 26, 2010 at 6:53 AM (Answer #1)

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The central conflict in Antigone has to do with the object of one's reverence:  the laws of man, or the laws of the gods.  Antigone argues that the laws of the gods are much more important than the laws of man, so she resolves to bury her brother Polyneices even though Creon has ordered that anyone who tries to bury the body will receive the penalty of death.  Creon believes that the laws of man are above all, and he does not make an exception in this regard.  What appears to be Antigone's struggle at the beginning of the play slowly shifts to Creon's struggle as his son begs him to reconsider his rule.  Haemon is supported by Teiresias and the people of Thebes, but Creon does not bend until it is too late.

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megaaa | Student , Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted January 4, 2011 at 5:51 AM (Answer #2)

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The main conflict in the play is portrayed through the unsettled   argument  between Antigone and Creon. Both of creon and Antigone have a fatal flaw in their character that leads to this conflict. Antigone is in despaired need to a noble death so she insists  on burying the corpse of her brother despite her knowledge of the penalty of death for such act .on th other hand,Creon also insists on punishing Antigone even she is his niece and aslo his son future wife which brings yo us his hamartia which is excessive pride and rashness .this kind of conflict is a personal one .As a man Ceron can not accept the idea of rebellious woman so he sentenced her to death.

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