What book should I read next?something interesting like * ghosts * Young Adult fiction

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lmetcalf's profile pic

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I would recommend anything by Sherman Alexie.  He is a modern  American Indian writer with a great sense of humor who tells a good story.  He is probably best known for Reservation Blues, but The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian is wonderful.  It is about a teenage Indian young man who decides to go to high school off the reservation.  His trials and tribulations, as well as his achievements, will put a smile on your face.

ktmagalia's profile pic

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My book club read The Road a couple of years ago, and like you, I read it in one day.  I could not put it down.  I liked the way the father/son relationship was developed throughout, the father seeing his role primarily as the protector; the son worried about ethics.  I thought  McCarthy captured very well the feelings that a parent has in a terrifying situation.  I think that is one of his trademarks.  He puts ordinary people in extraordinary situations that test their caliber. No Country for Old Men followed this type of conflict.  I have not seen the movie  to The Road yet, and I'm not sure I will.  I have a difficult time seeing how the subtleties in the novel could be adequately portrayed on film.  After your comments, it might be a long while before I see the film.  McCarthy is a wonderful writer.  I also enjoyed All the Pretty Horses as well as The Crossing.

Actually, I think the movie was well done (more detailed with the violence), but not so much as to turn me off from the story.   I love his writing as well.  I haven't read The Crossing and the other in the triology yet, but I will.  Let me know if you see the movie!

susan3smith's profile pic

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My book club read The Road a couple of years ago, and like you, I read it in one day.  I could not put it down.  I liked the way the father/son relationship was developed throughout, the father seeing his role primarily as the protector; the son worried about ethics.  I thought  McCarthy captured very well the feelings that a parent has in a terrifying situation.  I think that is one of his trademarks.  He puts ordinary people in extraordinary situations that test their caliber. No Country for Old Men followed this type of conflict.  I have not seen the movie  to The Road yet, and I'm not sure I will.  I have a difficult time seeing how the subtleties in the novel could be adequately portrayed on film.  After your comments, it might be a long while before I see the film.  McCarthy is a wonderful writer.  I also enjoyed All the Pretty Horses as well as The Crossing.

ktmagalia's profile pic

Posted on

Started reading The Road yesterday morning and  finished in the afternoon. I just couldn't put it down.  Well, I put it down long enough to make a sandwich, but you know what I mean.  Cormac McCarthy's fast paced syntax and in your face word choice mesmorized me. Actually having seen the movie first really added a new perspective to my reading. I appreciated McCarthy's detail, and the elements of plot which were furthered developed in the novel intrigued me. So, why in the movie, was there so much more blood and gore? I suppose because blood and gore sells. It certainly wasn't needed, and I think that the excess blood actually overly colors the greyness and despair facing the two main characters.

jblederman's profile pic

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Hyperion by Dan Simmons. I cannot recommend this highly enough. It is considered hard science fiction, in that there is actual science in it (mainly physics), but it is accessible and ridiculously intelligent. If you are the type of person who finds the ending of any enjoyable book to be anticlimactic, you'll be happy to know that there are four books in the series, totaling more than 2000 pages. There are threads of Keats' poem Hyperion running through it, as well as influences from Shakespeare and even Baum. It's a beautiful story, far superior to (though could be compared to) and of the Star Wars nonsense.

mzach's profile pic

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"Shaking my hair from my eyes, I lifted my head ... and tried to look boldly round the dark room: at this moment a light gleamed on the wall. Was it, I asked myself, a ray from the moon penetrating some aperture in the blind? No; moonlight was still, and this stirred; while I gazed, it glided up to the ceiling and quivered over my head. I can now conjecture readily that this streak of light was, in all likelihood, a gleam from a lantern, carried by some one across the lawn: but then, prepared as my mind was for horror, shaken as my nerves were by agitation, I thought the swift-darting beam was a herald of some coming vision from another world. My heart beat thick, my head grew hot; a sound filled my ears, which I deemed the rushing of wings: something seemed near me; I was oppressed, suffocated: endurance broke down – I uttered a wild, involuntary cry – I rushed to thedoor and shook the lock in a desperate effort." - Jane Eyre

I would definitely recommend Jane Eyre.  It is a love story, but with a lot of mysterious twists and turns.  Perhaps even the appearance of a ghost!  There is a great balance in the book between mystery, suspense, and romance.  One of the things that I love most about it is that throughout the book, I wasn't able to always accurately predict what would happen next, which I feel is sometimes the case with other mysteries or ghost stories.  I liked that the feeling of suspense was always there!

dano7744's profile pic

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Have you ever read The Diary of Ann Frank? This is a wonderful story about a girl during wartime. It runs the full circle of emotions fear, hope,sorrow,anticipation. To some degree it is quite sad (you will cry), but it is not all doom and gloom. It is a story of persistence and perseverance .I think I first read it in the 7th or 8th grade and truly enjoyed it. Happy reading!

geosc's profile pic

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I recall two books that I read while I was in high school that I liked very much.  I recall the topics of others that I read that I liked O.K., but these are the two that I really liked.

H.T. Malone.  Cherokees of the Old South.

W.W. Blackford.  War Years with JEB Stuart.

clamo88's profile pic

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You might enjoy the fantasy/mystery series, The Dresden Files, by Jim Butcher.  You'll enjoy them better if you read them in order.  Lead character Harry Dresden is a detective and a wizard.  There was a short-lived (one season) TV Series on the SyFy Channel.

There is also a series of short stories available and a discussion forum on his website.

kapokkid's profile pic

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One of my all time favorites is "The Brothers K" by David James Duncan.  It is a story that makes me laugh and makes me cry every time I read it, which is already quite a few.  It is rather long, but it floats by thanks to some really fantastic pieces of writing about how a family interacts and deals with obstacles and tragedy and all kinds of difficulties that people face all the time.  And the characters are so powerfully real...  you will fall for them.  Well, I did anyway.

linda-allen's profile pic

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Try The Prophecy of the Sisters if you want something supernatural. You might consider them a little young for you, but the Percy Jackson books are great as well, and you'll learn a little bit of Greek mythology from them.

maadhav19's profile pic

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I don't know too many works that deal with ghosts, but you might try some of Ursula LeGuin's works, especially the Earthsea Trilogy: A Wizard of Earthsea, the Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore. They are fantasy and, come to think of it, they do deal with ghosts and crossing over to the other side of death and back. And they are exceptionally well written. While you're at it, you might also read her Hainish Chronicles, not because they deal with these themes, but because they are exquisite scifi. Philip K. Dick's Ubik might also work. If I remember right, there is a device in the novel for preserving the minds of the dead, so the living can still communicate with their lost loved ones.

teacher2011's profile pic

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If you like music and want to read some beautiful descriptions of jazz music try the short story Sonny’s Blues by James Baldwin. However, one of the most popular novels among my students is The Kite Runner. It is an approachable book for mature teenagers. The Kite Runner is a remarkable story of redemption that will immerse you in Afghani culture. You will have a hard time putting it down. This is an emotional and haunting book, and by the end, the novel leaves a lasting impression. Warning: there is a scene of sexual assault, so read this only if you are comfortable reading this sort of graphic content.

amy-lepore's profile pic

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Anything by Edgar Allan Poe may interest you...check out a book of his short stories and poems.  He is an American Gothic author and his stuff is full of the ghosts, strange happenings, and "it's alive!" kind of stuff you seem to be looking for in your next read.  Try "The Tell-Tale Heart," "The Black Cat," "The Fall of the House of Usher," and "The Pit and the Pendulum" first.  They will satisfy your taste for fear and the unknown.

Thanks for this question!  I enjoyed reading the other posts you've received and have added some other books to my stack of "to be reads".  Good Luck!

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