What is Bono's function in Fences?

1 Answer | Add Yours

akannan's profile pic

Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I think that Bono's function in the play is a hopeful one.  His purpose is to show that there can be redemption within the psyche of individuals no matter how difficult external conditions may be.  It is here in Bono's character where there is hope.  While Troy might be psychologically incapable of happiness or simply emotionally impotent to escape his own "fences," Bono has found happiness, a contentment with where he is in his consciousness.  His love for his wife is evident, even though she is not a character in the drama.  His ability to center himself emotionally is also evident in how he consistently counsels Troy to stop in his affair with Alberta.  Bono is a force of redemption, a sense of hope.  If Wilson does not include the presence of Bono, then the reality is that men like Troy, who are besieged with social and emotional challenges, would be shown to be incapable of happiness.  Bono forces the recognition that individuals do have freedom and autonomy.  Bono compels the reader/ audience to believe that individuals can act in the hope of escaping the "fences" that prevent them from enjoyment of life.  While it is a small character and not to the level of Troy in the play, Bono's role is significant in this regard.  In a cold and cruel world, there can be moments where individuals transcend "fences," escape their "walking blues," and find some happiness in a world that severely lacks it.

We’ve answered 317,542 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question