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What are the benefits of carbon fibre? How is it constructed?

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enotes | Valedictorian

Posted March 3, 2014 at 11:17 PM via web

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What are the benefits of carbon fibre? How is it constructed?

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Payal Khullar | College Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted March 4, 2014 at 3:31 PM (Answer #1)

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Carbon fibres, also known as graphite fibres, are very strong, high strength, stiff and lightweight material composed of carbon atoms chemically bonded together in a long chain. Carbon fibres also exhibit high chemical and thermal resistance. Because of these properties, carbon fibres act as desirable raw material for building high-quality sports equipment, airplanes, robots, etc. Carbon fibres are certainly superior to metal and other kinds of fibres. However, they are also quite expensive. Carbon fibres contain at least 90% carbon and are constructed through decomposition of certain precursor fibres at a high temperature in highly controlled conditions. Precursors such as PAN (polyacrylonitrile), rayon, petroleum, pitch, etc. can be used for making carbon fibres. Construction of carbon fibres happens in three stages- Stabilisation, Carbonisation and Graphitisation. Carbon fibres can also be combined with other strong materials to make Composite materials. 

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Payal Khullar

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CaitlynnReeves | TA , Grade 12 | Salutatorian

Posted March 5, 2014 at 3:02 PM (Answer #2)

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Carbon fiber is made up of long strands of carbon arranged in a straight line. This arrangement makes the bonds between carbon atoms stronger and the resulting material is very light weight. Because of this, carbon fiber makes for a very useful building material. It is ten times stronger than steel and five times lighter. It is commonly used in electronics, sports equipment, and musical instruments 

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