Homework Help

What is an example of alliteration and allusion in Act II, Scene 3 in Romeo and Juliet?  

user profile pic

buxtn | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted May 15, 2012 at 12:43 PM via web

dislike 1 like

What is an example of alliteration and allusion in Act II, Scene 3 in Romeo and Juliet?

 

1 Answer | Add Yours

user profile pic

litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted May 15, 2012 at 4:53 PM (Answer #1)

dislike 1 like

Alliteration is the repetition of initial sounds.  In Friar Lawrene’s initial speech in Act II, Scene 3, there are several examples of alliteration. 

The day to cheer and night's dank dew to dry (p. 45)

The alliteration continues with “virtue itself turns vice,” “slays all senses,” and “where the worser” (p. 45).

The use of alliteration, along with rhyme, in this speech adds to its singsong and magical quality.  There are other examples in the witty repartee between the two, including Frair telling Romeo “What early tongue so sweet saluteth me?” and Romeo telling Friar “[you] bad'st me bury love” (p. 47).

The use of alliteration contributes to the dream-like, poetic quality of this scene.  It is subtle, so it does not read like a tongue twister.  There’s just enough to get the right effect without tripping an actor up trying to say the lines.

An allusion is a reference to some other work or subject, usually mythology.  In this case there are references to horticulture, and the allusions to the plant world are used to reinforce the idea that Friar Lawrence is cultivating Romeo and Juliet’s relationship.

For the full text, read here: http://www.enotes.com/romeo-and-juliet-text

Sources:

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes