What are five items important to Scout (with one paragraph for each item) explaining the significance to the character in To Kill a Mockingbird?

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Overalls.  Scout hated dresses, always preferring to wear her overalls (or coveralls) nearly everywhere she went. They are a perfect fit for her tomboy ways, but she also seems to enjoy the way they antagonize many of the women who desire that she immediately become a lady. But on the night of Bob Ewell's attack on the children, even Aunt Alexandra uses them to comfort her niece.

She brought me something to put on, and had I thought about it then, I would have never let her forget it: in her distraction, Aunty brought me my overalls. "Put these on, darling," she said, handing me the garments she most despised.  (Chapter 29)

Baton.  It is Scout's brand new "twirling baton" (a gift from Jem) that her brother uses to destroy Mrs. Dubose's prize camellias. Scout hoped to one day twirl with the Maycomb High school band, but she would never get to practice with this baton, since Jem bent it "against his knee, snapped it in two and threw it down."

     I had long had my eye on that baton: ... it was bedecked with sequins and tinesel.  (Chapter 11)

Flying Fists.  Scout never lost a fight (except to Jem) during the course of the novel before finally taking Atticus's advice to stop fighting when she got angry. Her most satisfying battle comes against her obnoxious older cousin, Francis.

     This time, I split my knuckle to the bone on his front teeth. My left impaired, I sailed in with my right...  (Chapter 9)

Ham Costume.  It is ugly and cumbersome, but it's a good thing Scout wore it home from the Halloween pageant: Her costume saves her life when it prevents Bob Ewell's knife from getting to her.

Boo's Blanket.  It is the blanket placed on her shoulders by Boo Radley on the night of Miss Maudie's house fire that finally alerts the children that Boo is no one to fear; instead, he is a kindly--if unseen--neighbor trying his best to be the children's friend. Nevertheless,

     My stomach turned to water and I nearly through up...  (Chapter 8)


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