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Was Mona Lisa really smiling when the took the picture? Or was it just painted like...

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musiclover17 | Student, Grade 6 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted January 3, 2013 at 11:02 PM via web

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Was Mona Lisa really smiling when the took the picture? Or was it just painted like that?

I imagin that she was smileing. I don't see why she wouldn't. The painter would of painted the real picture.

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Kristen Lentz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted January 4, 2013 at 12:18 AM (Answer #2)

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Your question makes me think of Nat King Cole singing "Mona Lisa."

Since the painting's rise in popularity, especially after Walter Pater's essay in 1867, many people have debated about her enigmatic smile.  Not much is historically known about the original subject of the painting, Lisa del Giacondo, and even less is known about da Vinci's artistic decision making when creating the painting.  The speculation just adds to the mystery.

Sources:

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted January 10, 2013 at 9:30 PM (Answer #3)

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I think it is perfectly possible for a painter to use a model and then change the painting based on what he or she wanted.  Leonardo da Vinci might well have decided to add the smile later.  It is up to the artist.  Art is not about creating an exact replica.

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Destinee850 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted February 5, 2013 at 5:05 PM (Answer #4)

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I was told by a teacher a while back that Mona Lisa wasn't a real person and that it may have been Leonardo da Vinci himself. The teacher also said that da Vinci painted himself as a woman smiling because he knew something we didn't (which is that the Mona Lisa was actually Leonadro himself. But I'm not possitive that this information is true.

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