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Was the author successful getting the tone of the poem across to you, the reader?...

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jyargeau | Student, Grade 11 | eNoter

Posted May 23, 2010 at 6:29 AM via web

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  1. Was the author successful getting the tone of the poem across to you, the reader? What are the metaphors and Symbols in this poem? Whats it about?

The Childrens Hour:

 

Between the dark and the daylight,
   When the night is beginning to lower,
Comes a pause in the day's occupations,
   That is known as the Children's Hour.

I hear in the chamber above me
   The patter of little feet,
The sound of a door that is opened,
   And voices soft and sweet.

From my study I see in the lamplight,
   Descending the broad hall stair,
Grave Alice, and laughing Allegra,
   And Edith with golden hair.

A whisper, and then a silence:
   Yet I know by their merry eyes
They are plotting and planning together
   To take me by surprise.

A sudden rush from the stairway,
   A sudden raid from the hall!
By three doors left unguarded
   They enter my castle wall!

They climb up into my turret
   O'er the arms and back of my chair;
If I try to escape, they surround me;
   They seem to be everywhere.

They almost devour me with kisses,
   Their arms about me entwine,
Till I think of the Bishop of Bingen
   In his Mouse-Tower on the Rhine!

Do you think, O blue-eyed banditti,
   Because you have scaled the wall,
Such an old mustache as I am
   Is not a match for you all!

I have you fast in my fortress,
   And will not let you depart,
But put you down into the dungeon
   In the round-tower of my heart.

And there will I keep you forever,
   Yes, forever and a day,
Till the walls shall crumble to ruin,
   And moulder in dust away!

3 Answers | Add Yours

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lynnebh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted May 23, 2010 at 6:45 AM (Answer #1)

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In this poem by Longfellow, "the children's hour" is that time:

Between the dark and the daylight,
   When the night is beginning to lower

When it is time for children to go to bed. The children are getting ready for bed -- their father hears them getting ready in the room above, and soon they are scrambling onto his lap for a bedtime story.

Yet I know by their merry eyes
They are plotting and planning together
   To take me by surprise.

The children are planning to coerce their father into telling them a bedtime story. The the Bishop of Bingen is a character in a story that the father has no doubt told to the children before. It is probably a tale of romance, of knights and princesses that need to be rescued from high "turrets" and "fortresses". The castle imagery is a metaphor for the fairy-tale stores the father has told and the children enjoy. "Blue eyed banditi" is a metaphor for the children - bandits with blue eyes, that are forcing him to tell them a story, but they are no match for him, because he loves them and wants to tell them a story anyway.

He continues with the castle imagery to describe his love for the children"

I have you fast in my fortress,
   And will not let you depart,
But put you down into the dungeon
   In the round-tower of my heart.

His fortress is his armchair, or his study, and while they are there, he can love them, tell them stories, and keep them in his heart.

Longfellow had five children and was known to be a tender and loving father. I think this comes across in the poem, and it is succesful, don't you agree?

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shubhambajaj | Student , Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted June 29, 2011 at 9:50 PM (Answer #2)

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In this poem by Longfellow, "the children's hour" is that time:

Between the dark and the daylight,
When the night is beginning to lower

When it is time for children to go to bed. The children are getting ready for bed -- their father hears them getting ready in the room above, and soon they are scrambling onto his lap for a bedtime story.

Yet I know by their merry eyes
They are plotting and planning together
To take me by surprise.

The children are planning to coerce their father into telling them a bedtime story. The the Bishop of Bingen is a character in a story that the father has no doubt told to the children before. It is probably a tale of romance, of knights and princesses that need to be rescued from high "turrets" and "fortresses". The castle imagery is a metaphor for the fairy-tale stores the father has told and the children enjoy. "Blue eyed banditi" is a metaphor for the children - bandits with blue eyes, that are forcing him to tell them a story, but they are no match for him, because he loves them and wants to tell them a story anyway.

He continues with the castle imagery to describe his love for the children"

I have you fast in my fortress,
And will not let you depart,
But put you down into the dungeon
In the round-tower of my heart.

His fortress is his armchair, or his study, and while they are there, he can love them, tell them stories, and keep them in his heart.

Longfellow had five children and was known to be a tender and loving father. I think this comes across in the poem, and it is succesful, don't you agree?

 

 

 

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shubhambajaj | Student , Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted June 29, 2011 at 9:51 PM (Answer #3)

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The Childrens Hour:

 

 

Between the dark and the daylight, When the night is beginning to lower, Comes a pause in the day's occupations, That is known as the Children's Hour. I hear in the chamber above me The patter of little feet, The sound of a door that is opened, And voices soft and sweet. From my study I see in the lamplight, Descending the broad hall stair, Grave Alice, and laughing Allegra, And Edith with golden hair. A whisper, and then a silence: Yet I know by their merry eyes They are plotting and planning together To take me by surprise. A sudden rush from the stairway, A sudden raid from the hall! By three doors left unguarded They enter my castle wall! They climb up into my turret O'er the arms and back of my chair; If I try to escape, they surround me; They seem to be everywhere. They almost devour me with kisses, Their arms about me entwine, Till I think of the Bishop of Bingen In his Mouse-Tower on the Rhine! Do you think, O blue-eyed banditti, Because you have scaled the wall, Such an old mustache as I am Is not a match for you all! I have you fast in my fortress, And will not let you depart, But put you down into the dungeon In the round-tower of my heart. And there will I keep you forever, Yes, forever and a day, Till the walls shall crumble to ruin, And moulder in dust away!

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