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I want to use connotation in my sentences. And this is my sentence.    "Dive into the...

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darkshadow122 | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted December 13, 2011 at 7:42 PM via web

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I want to use connotation in my sentences. And this is my sentence.

 

 

"Dive into the ocean and swim with orcas."

I used "orca" instead of saying "killer whales"; therefore, could you please tell me that have I used connotation?  Thank you

 

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wordprof | College Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted December 14, 2011 at 2:34 AM (Answer #1)

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My first reaction is that you have avoided connotation, by removing the “baggage” from the term “killer whale.”  The word “orca” has very little connotation, unless you see it as a more technical, accurate term.  “Connotation” is “implied tone” above and beyond the actual denotation of a word (its “dictionary definition”), usually attached to a word because of it common usage in a “frozen” idiom or phrase -- “prejudice” has the connotation of negativity because of its use in the phrase “racial prejudice,” so you run into trouble if you use it without acknowledging its connotation (“When it comes to art, I have a prejudice toward abstract paintings.”)  The difference among a “law enforcement officer” and a “flatfoot” and a “copper” and a “policeman” is in their connotations, not their denotations.

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