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i want short notes about the development  of jane character in Jane Eyrehow the other...

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kooky1 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 8, 2010 at 4:29 AM via web

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i want short notes about the development  of jane character in Jane Eyre

how the other characters effect on her character

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neneta | High School Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted December 8, 2010 at 8:03 PM (Answer #1)

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The novel Jane Eyre is an example of a bildungsroman as it portrays the youth development of the protagonist throughout her life. The various difficulties happen in order to achieve maturity and to adjust to the social norms. Thus, the story is told retrospectively, in a first-person narrator and the narrator, Jane Eyre, is a character. Hence, we follow Jane’s journey since her childhood to adult life.

There are several points that I find useful to understand Jane’s development:

1.   Jane is an orphan, living with her wealthy relatives. After an incident with her cousin John Reed, her auntie decides to send her to Lowood, a school for orphans.
2. At school, after having been accused of being a liar, Jane undergoes some changes. Namely, another pupil Helen Burns contributes to Jane’s moral change.
3. After having completed her education, Jane decides to become a governess.
4. Jane starts to work as a governess in Thornfield, teaching a young French girl, Adele Varens.
5. The master of Thornfield, Mr. Rochester arrives, which implies social change in Jane’s life.
6. Eventually, Jane and Mr.Rochester become in love, but their social differences hinder a possible marriage.
7. Finally, Rochester decides to marry Jane but the wedding is impeded since Rochester has already a wife, the mad woman who lives in the attic.
8. Grief-stricken, Jane decides to run away.
9. Jane settles down in Whitecross, working as a teacher. Later, she discovers that the people who have helped her are her distant relatives.
10. Jane inherits money from her uncle, John Eyre. Henceforth she returns to Thornfield, but this time as an equal to Rochester.
11. Jane finally marries Rochester and the couple lives happily at last.

The last point is very relevant in that Jane is just a poor governess; for this reason, a marriage between Jane and Rochester proves unfeasible due to the their social differences. However, as soon as Jane becomes a rich heiress, she at once becomes social equal to Rochester, making their union plausible.

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neneta | High School Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted December 8, 2010 at 8:06 PM (Answer #2)

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The novel Jane Eyre is an example of a bildungsroman as it portrays the youth development of the protagonist throughout her life. The various difficulties happen in order to achieve maturity and to adjust to the social norms. Thus, the story is told retrospectively, in a first-person narrator and the narrator, Jane Eyre, is a character. Hence, we follow Jane’s journey since her childhood to adult life.

There are several points that I find useful to understand Jane’s development:

1.   Jane is an orphan, living with her wealthy relatives. After an incident with her cousin John Reed, her auntie decides to send her to Lowood, a school for orphans.
2. At school, after having been accused of being a liar, Jane undergoes some changes. Namely, another pupil Helen Burns contributes to Jane’s moral change.
3. After having completed her education, Jane decides to become a governess.
4. Jane starts to work as a governess in Thornfield, teaching a young French girl, Adele Varens.
5. The master of Thornfield, Mr. Rochester arrives, which implies social change in Jane’s life.
6. Eventually, Jane and Mr.Rochester become in love, but their social differences hinder a possible marriage.
7. Finally, Rochester decides to marry Jane but the wedding is impeded since Rochester has already a wife, the mad woman who lives in the attic.
8. Grief-stricken, Jane decides to run away.
9. Jane settles down in Whitecross, working as a teacher. Later, she discovers that the people who have helped her are her distant relatives.
10. Jane inherits money from her uncle, John Eyre. Henceforth she returns to Thornfield, but this time as an equal to Rochester.
11. Jane finally marries Rochester and the couple lives happily at last.

The last point is very relevant in that Jane is just a poor governess; for this reason, a marriage between Jane and Rochester proves unfeasible due to the their social differences. However, as soon as Jane becomes a rich heiress, she at once becomes social equal to Rochester, making their union plausible.

how the other characters effect on her character

The last point is very relevant in that Jane is just a poor governess; for this reason, a marriage between Jane and Rochester proves unfeasible due to the their social differences. However, as soon as Jane becomes a rich heiress, she at once becomes social equal to Rochester, making their union plausible.

 

. In Jane Eyre, Mrs. Reed, John Reed, and Mr. Brocklehurst,  are antagonists because they are Jane's opponents. Nevertheless, they contribute to Jane’s development: Mrs. Reed cares little for Jane and sees her only as a burden, Mr. Brocklehurst attitude raises the question of hypocrisy and John Reed is doubtless a bully. On the other hand, even though they are minor characters, Helene Burns, Miss Temple and Mrs. Fairfax, are relevant to Jane’s emotional growth: Helen Burns teaches Jane the virtues of patience, lenience and indulgence, Miss Temple believes in Jane’s honesty and Mrs. Fairfax works as a social companion to Jane.

 

For further information about characters look at the following link:

Source: http://www.enotes.com/jane-eyre/characters

 

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