In "Harrison Bergeron," do men and woman remain fundamentally the same no matter what technology surrounds them??

2 Answers | Add Yours

mshurn's profile pic

Susan Hurn | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Yes, they do. Their government cannot change them through technology; the government can only attempt to control them. The story makes a strong case for the human spirit and makes it clear that a tyrannical government must control it if absolute power is to be preserved. Despite his most severe handicaps, Harrison Bergeron's spirit was not broken by the state. He defied the government, escaped from prison, took control of the television studio, and expressed his humanity for a few beautiful and sublime moments with the ballerina. Since the government could not control Harrison or let the example of his rebellious spirit take root in the populace, they killed him and his dancing partner. Harrison was most dangerous because his actions might remind others of their own humanity. Harrison's mother watches her son's death on television. She can't remember what she has seen, but she cries. The government, with all its technology, has not changed her heart and soul at all.


apbrown's profile pic

apbrown | High School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

Men and women do remain fundamentally the same, in spite of, the technology that surrounds them. The best example of the fundamental essence of men and women in Harrison himself because he fights to hold onto his own individuality. Harrison's tenacity and uniqueness is not over-shadowed by the handicaps the government has placed on him. Harrison's rebellion against the the government forces readers to question society's obsession with people's perception of equality. Ironically, we live in a society that sometimes promotes the premise that equality is always fair. For instance, our government creates standardized assessments that measure all children by the same standards. Well, what about the students who have different learning experiences or students of a different nationality? Is it fair to treat these students like everyone else?

Harrison is a reminder that uniqueness is a gift. We are all special because we are different. If we were all the same then the world would be boring and grey. Harrison fought to hold onto his own individuality.

We’ve answered 317,625 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question