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vocabularyI  would  like   to  know  if it  is  irksome  for students  to...

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madre | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 7, 2007 at 6:37 AM via web

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vocabulary

I  would  like   to  know  if it  is  irksome  for students  to look  up the books   archaic  expressions?

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alexb2 | eNotes Employee

Posted October 7, 2007 at 2:04 PM (Answer #2)

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I think it's all part of the process... when reading a book with archaic vocab or expressions, it can be kind of fun to figure out what it all means. However there is definitely an element of annoyance after awhile, when you just want to 'get on with it' and read the story. Good footnotes always make this much easier.

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Jamie Wheeler | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted October 7, 2007 at 3:29 PM (Answer #3)

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vocabulary

I  would  like   to  know  if it  is  irksome  for students  to look  up the books   archaic  expressions?

You don't say what age your students are, but I agree with blazedale...too cumbersome and you lose them.  Footnotes help, but anything that enhances meaning can enrich the experience

When I taught high school, I found that crosswords or other games could be fun and not make the process so tedious.  There are crossword templates out there you can use...just google it!

Good luck. 

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sagetrieb | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted October 7, 2007 at 4:34 PM (Answer #4)

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I disagree.  I teach even my freshman students to use the OED, and all (even through seniors) maintain a vocabulary notebook where they are required to look up words and record their meaning.  I provide most (not all) of the vocab words for the younger students, with archaic expression always included, but by senior year they do the choosing.  I have them collect 250 words per quarter. They might remember the words and they might not; I grade the notebook only for the fact that they write the words down and look them up. My rationale is that the words do in someway become part of their "muscle memory" and they begin a habit of using the dictionary. I emphasize how this will help boost their SAT scores, and their complaints are minor. At the end of the year they have 1000 words  recorded and they feel pretty good about that.

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madre | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 7, 2007 at 4:42 PM (Answer #5)

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vocabulary

I  would  like   to  know  if it  is  irksome  for students  to look  up the books   archaic  expressions?

You don't say what age your students are, but I agree with blazedale...too cumbersome and you lose them.  Footnotes help, but anything that enhances meaning can enrich the experience

When I taught high school, I found that crosswords or other games could be fun and not make the process so tedious.  There are crossword templates out there you can use...just google it!

Good luck. 

Thank you for taking the time to reply.  Cross word puzzles are a good idea.  To be fair I am not a real teacher, I home school.  My son loathes the book. I am trying to think of ways to make him like it. It reminds me of a line in a book called The Mystery of Shadow Pond. Two boys were discussing the book Silas Marner.  One said of it "if the whole world was under water that book would still be dry!  I think that is how my son feels of Men of Iron! Alas!Thank you again.  Hope all is well with your family too.  Madre

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madre | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 8, 2007 at 3:08 AM (Answer #6)

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 Thank you all for responding.  I now ask all you professionals if iti is true that grammar is only taught in parochial schools.  My teacher friend in  public schools says grammar is not taught there.  I need help with teaching  noun particles and diagramming too.   ____l_____l______  Who can help?

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sagetrieb | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted October 8, 2007 at 3:39 AM (Answer #7)

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Grammar is a constant topic of conversation within the English department at my school.  We are now endeavoring to follow the NCTE guidelines that emphasize that students learn grammar through writing and reading rather than through worksheet exercises and rules. To accomplish this, we teach "mini lessons" as they arise in literature and writing situations.  We are not a private school, and perhaps this makes it possible to teach grammar this way.  However, we still struggle with students learning rules and the vocabulary of grammar as well--and how extensive of a vocabulary of grammar they need to know to write well and be educated, too. Do students need to know a gerund is a gerund for example, or do they only need to know how to create sentence variety? Image Grammar offers one of several new approaches to teaching grammar through writing that students enjoy and that, to a certain extent, works.

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Jamie Wheeler | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted October 8, 2007 at 7:02 AM (Answer #8)

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 Thank you all for responding.  I now ask all you professionals if iti is true that grammar is only taught in parochial schools.  My teacher friend in  public schools says grammar is not taught there.  I need help with teaching  noun particles and diagramming too.   ____l_____l______  Who can help?

I think knowledge of how to create colorful sentences and use interesting language is more important than diagramming.   There are several books out that make language fun by pointing out what's wrong instead of what's right. One is the wildly popular "Eats, Shoots, and Leaves"; another is "Woe is I" and a third is "When Good People Write Bad Sentences."  If you really want to focus on the "right" way, you can't beat the classic, "Strunk & White's Elements of Style."  A recent illustrated edition makes it more fun and also assists learners who lean toward the more visual. 

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madre | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 9, 2007 at 3:04 AM (Answer #9)

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I wish to thank all of you fine professionals for helping me - a poor Catholic home-school mother! I will pray for you and your families every day. I shall  close with the prayer I recite for you as benefactors:  Bless O Lord with eternal life, those who do good for us for Thy Names's sake.  Bendicion.

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted October 9, 2010 at 9:18 AM (Answer #10)

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I use a text called Daily Grammar Practice. This uses the same sentence every day for a week. Monday addresses the parts of speech for the sentence. Tuesday addresses the sentence parts. Wednesday addresses the clause(s) and sentence types. Thursday addresses capitalization. Friday addresses diagramming. Other mini-lessons are embedded in the sentence, and this arrangement is wonderful because each day builds on and reinforces the learning from the previous days.

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