World War I (1914–18) Homework Help

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  • World War I (1914–18)
    Of course, we can never know for certain how World War I would have turned out if the United States had not become involved. We cannot go back and do the war over to see what would have happened....

    Asked by kyaw on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    World War I had many consequences. It is likely that, if you are asked to “list” them, your textbook provides such a list. I suggest that you look in your book or your notes for such a list....

    Asked by tin on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The country that is most often cited as the major cause of World War I is Germany. Germany was not the country that first declared war in this conflict. However, historians often say that Germany...

    Asked by kumbiegh on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The results of the Paris Peace Conference (mainly the Treaty of Versailles) created problems in postwar Europe mostly because of how they treated Germany. The Treaty of Versailles treated Germany...

    Asked by hotwheelscrazy on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The shortest answer to this question would be that historians do not generally regard events as inevitable. They rather tend to emphasize that events like World War I are contingent on human...

    Asked by hotwheelscrazy on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    There are two ways to answer this. First, the US government used repressive laws to prevent dissent against the war. These were the Espionage and Sedition Acts. They did things such as...

    Asked by kguidry39 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The date of the ceasefire that ended World War I is significant in the United States today because it is the day on which we no celebrate Veterans Day. That date is November 11. The war ended...

    Asked by kguidry39 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    Submarines were mainly used in this war against merchant ships rather than against military ships. This was done both by the Germans and by the British, but it was much more important for the...

    Asked by prisaranghae on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    You can make such an argument in two possible ways. First, you can argue that it was necessary from a practical point of view. The war was badly hurting Britain, with which the United States had a...

    Asked by kguidry39 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The effect on the Ottoman Empire was that it would be broken up. When the Ottoman Empire entered WWI, it did so on the side of the Central Powers. This was, of course, the side that lost the war....

    Asked by demon300 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The Western Front in World War I was the part of the war that was fought in Western Europe. This is as opposed to the other fronts of the war, which were fought in places like Russia or at...

    Asked by megan-westerfield on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The Schlieffen Plan resulted in a stalemate because the German high command did not sufficiently commit to that plan. The plan called for a very token force to be left to defend Germany against a...

    Asked by megan-westerfield on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    If we leave out social impacts, the main impacts on the US were economic and political. Politically, World War I helped to cause a certain amount of intolerance in the US. It was during this war...

    Asked by lkballer24 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    In the short term, the Treaty of Versailles did not have a huge impact on England. The treaty did not give England any new territory that would really belong to it (England did end up with some...

    Asked by mina0421 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The lasting effect of the Treaty of Versailles was World War II. This was the most important effect that this treaty had. The treaty led very directly to WWII because it made Germany very unhappy....

    Asked by kristenmariebieber on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    What was going on before the Treaty of Versailles was World War I. The Treaty of Versailles was the peace treaty that was made after WWI ended. Looking at the treaty itself, the most relevant...

    Asked by kristenmariebieber on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The best way to answer this is to say that the Treaty of Versailles was directed at Germany. A treaty is binding on all nations that sign it, but this treaty was clearly "directed at" Germany. The...

    Asked by kristenmariebieber on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The Treaty of Versailles was the creation of the leaders of the victorious powers. They met in Paris to hash out the details of the treaty among themselves. At first, there were representatives...

    Asked by kristenmariebieber on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The Treaty of Versailles contained what it did because those provisions were what the victorious powers wanted. The Americans, the British, and the French in particular put in provisions that they...

    Asked by kristenmariebieber on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The United States was not in World War I for any kind of material or territorial gain. Therefore, it did not gain in any tangible way from fighting in the war. It got no new territory and no...

    Asked by fellm on via web

    2 educator answers.

  • World War II (1939–45)
    There are at least three major similarities. First, both wars were caused by the efforts of some countries to change the international order and the efforts of other countries to prevent that. For...

    Asked by brickboy on via web

    3 educator answers.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    Nationalism was one of the many causes of World War I. Many countries began to develop an extreme sense that their nation, way of life, and culture were superior to those of any other nation. Thus,...

    Asked by lilmommy on via web

    2 educator answers.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    There are many possible phrases that could be used, with different phrases to describe the US and various countries in Europe. As some examples, we could use: Idealistic and pacificistic. This...

    Asked by rfriedl on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The major difference between these two is that World War II ended very definitively while World War I just sort of fizzled out with Germany's surrender. In WWI, Germany was not decisively defeated....

    Asked by nmeisu on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The major reason for this was the fact that the United States wanted to be able to continue trading with the countries of Europe. This was an important thing for the US economy since losing...

    Asked by ygraciane on via web

    3 educator answers.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    To argue this, you would have to say that there is an inherent human right to be ruled by people of your own ethnic group. You would have to say that this is a right on the same level as the right...

    Asked by pasha30 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    World War I was known as the "Great War" not because it was wonderful but because it was big. This is the sense of "great" that is being used here. WWI was big in part because more countries were...

    Asked by jennifer97 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The top two countries hardest hit were Russia and France. They both had devastating military losses, economic hardship, and decreased morale after World War I. Russia had the most casualties in...

    Asked by kristenmariebieber on via web

    4 educator answers.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The battle of the St. Eloi Craters is significant mainly in terms of Canadian history. It was a relatively minor battle in terms of the overall war and was dwarfed in importance by the Battle of...

    Asked by elisa96 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    No, this is not correct. All of the areas that you mention in this question are in fact on the Western Front. What you must remember is that the term "Western Front" refers to all of the...

    Asked by chasey0 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    If it has to be one of these two battles, it can only be Verdun. Verdun was a battle in which the French army did suffer massive losses. In this battle, at least 360,000 French soldiers were...

    Asked by chasey0 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    Of the options that you have given us here, the best answer is #2. Women in many countries, including the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, and France, were brought into the work force...

    Asked by chasey0 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The historical impact of a battle such as this is hard to determine with any precision. We cannot know for sure how such an event impacts history. One way to look at this, however, is to say...

    Asked by babyryan95 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The Battle of the Somme was mainly important for the fact that it led to the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of people over the course of a few months. The battle caused the deaths of an...

    Asked by babyryan95 on via web

    3 educator answers.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The single largest contributing factor to the 'world-wide' aspect of World War I was treaties that resulted in entangling alliances. An alliance is when two or more countries agree to help each...

    Asked by enotedude on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The American Expeditionary Force saw action in the part of the Western Front that was farthest to the east. This was an area that was pretty far to the south, south of Luxembourg and more or less...

    Asked by chasey0 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    This depends on what you would call a "political result" and the time frame that you are asking about. In the very short term, WWI had two major political results. It resulted in the fall of the...

    Asked by t521863 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    World War I had very little impact on the institution of colonialism as a whole. It did have impacts on specific colonies, but it did not change the fact that colonialism was widespread nor did it...

    Asked by sistare0 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    Germany was disappointed with this treaty because it punished Germany very harshly. It made Germany claim complete responsibility and guilt for WWI. On top of that, it did many things that hurt...

    Asked by zainab313 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The official reason that Italy did not enter the war was because its alliance with Germany and Austria-Hungary was defensive. Italy declared that it was not obligated to go to war because...

    Asked by dorkfish99 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    George Norris is opposing the idea of US entry into WWI on two major grounds. First, he is saying that the US was never truly neutral. He is saying that Wilson is proposing to enter the war on...

    Asked by jewel2005 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    In this speech, President Wilson is setting forth his reasons for wanting to go to war against Germany. There are two major reasons that Wilson gives for wanting war. First, Wilson argues that the...

    Asked by jewel2005 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    You did not specify which war you were asking about, so I have guessed that you are asking about WWI. I have changed your question to reflect this and I hope I made the right choice. The main...

    Asked by t521863 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    There were two major reasons for this. First, the Ottomans had had fairly shaky relations with the Allied Powers. This was especially true with regard to Russia. Russia had a strategic interest...

    Asked by trialanderror on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The connection between these two is that World War I served as a catalyst for the Russian Revolution. Russians had been very unhappy with their government for decades, and WWI pushed them over the...

    Asked by trialanderror on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    You have tagged this with "trench warfare," and the fact that trench warfare dominated this time period shows us that there were very few German advances in the west after the very beginning of the...

    Asked by trialanderror on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    No, the Senate should not have approved the Treaty of Versailles as it was presented to them. Instead, President Wilson should have been less adamant about having the treaty passed exactly the way...

    Asked by kristibsutamante on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    World War I undermined the myth of European invincibility by showing how the Europeans were not morally or culturally superior. One of the major defenses of European imperialism had been the idea...

    Asked by aglaiapapaya on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    First of all, please note that Turkey was not a country during WWI. It was the Ottoman Empire, and not Turkey, which participated in WWI on the losing side. The fact that the Ottomans were on the...

    Asked by nmeisu on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • World War I (1914–18)
    The major reason for this is that the Germans were more ready for the war and they had a better plan. Germany had been wanting a war for some time. They had also been planning for the war....

    Asked by pwin14 on via web

    1 educator answer.

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