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  • Song: To Celia
    When Celia receives the wreath from the speaker, she breathes on it and then, instead of keeping it, sends it back to the speaker: I sent thee late a rosy wreath,Not so much honoring thee,As...

    Asked by user9098077 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Song: To Celia
    Ben Jonson's poem "Song to Celia" is a short love poem, often performed as a song. Both stanzas evoke Jonson's understanding of love by use of extended metaphors, but underneath the metaphorical...

    Asked by nancyvaldes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Song: To Celia
    One of the wonderful things about poetry (and song lyrics, which are another version of poetry) is that the author as well as those who read the poem aloud (or sing the lyrics) have some freedom...

    Asked by kmclark on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Song: To Celia
    The poem, "Song to Celia," by Ben Jonson (1572-1637), contains just two characters: a woman named Celia, and an unnamed narrator, who is her lover. In the beginning of the poem, the lover pledges...

    Asked by user9408693 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Song: To Celia
    "Song: To Celia" is divided into two stanzas, each containing eight lines. The poem is tightly structured but it does vary in terms of metrical feet (stressed and unstressed syllable patterns). For...

    Asked by eramlo on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Song: To Celia
    As Terence Dawson and Robert Scott Dupree note in their splendid book titled Seventeenth-Century English Poetry: An Annotated Edition, Ben Jonson’s lyric beginning “Drink to me only with thine...

    Asked by mayflower1 on via web

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  • Song: To Celia
    In the poem "Song: To Celia," Ben Johnson uses as iambic meter, or syllabic beat, changing every other line between four and three iambs (if these lines are considered together, it could be called...

    Asked by hairdoggie2 on via web

    2 educator answers.

  • Song: To Celia
    One interesting feature of this poem is that there are absolutely no adjectives in the poem which describe Celia. This is somewhat unusual for a love poem of the period, in which extensive...

    Asked by pudge59 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Song: To Celia
    Poems of love always seek to exalt the loved one to a tremendous extent, and this famous love poem by Ben Johnson is no exception. As the speaker tries to encourage his beloved to give him a sign...

    Asked by perez1994 on via web

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  • Song: To Celia
    There are a number of meanings that you can infer from the words of this poem. In some ways, inferred meanings are in the opinion of the reader -- that's why they are inferred. You can infer, for...

    Asked by utadafreak22 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Song: To Celia
    Here's a quick mixture of paraphrase and interpretation of Jonson's "Song: To Celia" to help you understand it. Drink only to me with your eyes, or Drink to me with only your eyes (metaphor:...

    Asked by nilya on via web

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  • Song: To Celia
    Ben Jonson's, "Song: To Celia," is about a speaker in the early stage of love, the infatuation stage. It is witty and epigrammatic, full of often-repeated, now-famous lines: Drink to me only...

    Asked by renee0623 on via web

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  • Song: To Celia
    In "To Celia," the lover states in lines 9-12, I sent thee late a rosy wreath,/Not so much honoring thee/As giving it a hope that there/It could not withered be Thus, by his own admission, he has...

    Asked by mischelle on via web

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  • Song: To Celia
    i guess it's cavalier since ben jonson is known as the father of cavalier poetry, and his followers are known as 'sons of ben'.

    Asked by yannie on via web

  • Song: To Celia
    The "rosy wreath" is a bouquet of roses that the speaker has sent to the lady, Celia. The eNotes study guide has a very good interpretation of these flowers: Jonson uses the rosy wreath, however,...

    Asked by rawna on via web

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  • Song: To Celia
    It's written in alternating lines of tetrameter and trimeter (that is, a line with four stresses, and a line with three stresses). I've put the scansion below (x is a strong stress, and - is a weak...

    Asked by star-spencer on via web

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  • Song: To Celia
    He sent her a "rosy wreath." She sent it back. He doesn't say directly how it makes him feel. He says that he smells it now, because it smells like her, and not like roses, so he claims that he's...

    Asked by sarahmt on via web

    1 educator answer.