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  • Shoeless Joe
    One question would be what is selflessness? Based on what is seen in Kinsella's work, how is selflessness defined? How do specific characters' actions reflect it? Explorations here could focus...

    Asked by tiarnanmoyer2 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    There are several examples of selflessness in Shoeless Joe. Annie, Ray's wife, is particularly selfless, as she allows him to build a baseball field on their farm. She tells him, "Oh, love, if it...

    Asked by tiarnan-1 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    The manner in which Kinsella depicts baseball shows some of the strongest examples of selflessness in Shoeless Joe. The game of baseball is shown to be bigger than the individual. Baseball is able...

    Asked by c3770003 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    As the book starts, the narrator, Ray, is sitting in a field that he describes in the following way: "In reality, all anyone else could see out there in front of me was a tattered lawn of mostly...

    Asked by amontag31 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    The field that Ray builds is a symbol in itself. Ray first describes "coddling that field like a child" (page 8). The field is the repository of dreams, and Ray builds it and nurses it like it is a...

    Asked by beauty2047 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    W.P. Kinsella’s novel Shoeless Joe is more widely known in its film adaptation, Field of Dreams. This novel fits the magical realism genre because fantasy elements are presented in a realistic...

    Asked by nclayman on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Magical realism is the use of supernatural elements in an otherwise normal and ordered world. In Shoeless Joe by W.P. Kinsella (the novel that was the basis of the film Field of Dreams), the main...

    Asked by nclayman on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Magical realism (also called magic realism) is a literary movement often associated with Latin-American authors. Magical realism attempts to establish a realistic setting in which fantastic or...

    Asked by nclayman on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Ray Kinsella's birthstone is a diamond. This is fitting because baseball is played on a diamond-shaped field. Ray is a baseball fanatic. When he asks himself why he would want to carry out the...

    Asked by joshc4298 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    The first, and most obvious second chance is the one afforded to Shoeless Joe Jackson. Getting a chance to play baseball again, after being banned, and after being dead, is more of a third chance....

    Asked by cameron1661 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Ray Kinsella is the main character. He is impractical; he is an idealist, a dreamer. He was close to his father and one of the strong bonds between them was based on baseball. Among his wife and...

    Asked by dlvslv13 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Frustrated life goals is thematic of W. P. Kinsella's novel. His main character, a farmer in Iowa named Ray Kinsella hears voices that tell him to build a baseball field in one of his corn fields....

    Asked by naccshow on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Annie's primary role is to be a source of support for Ray. She tirelessly supports Ray's endeavors of building the field and acting upon his own notion of the good. While the rest of the town...

    Asked by dodich17 on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • The Natural
    Besides having the topic of baseball and players' hopes, dreams, fears and failures in common, there are a number of themes that can be analyzed and compared as having a prominent role in each of...

    Asked by crystaltsau on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Both novels address the transformative capacity of baseball on the individual. In The Universal Baseball Association, Inc, J. Henry Waugh, Prop., the world of baseball transforms Henry's reality....

    Asked by crystaltsau on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    One thesis statement in describing the characterization of Salinger is to discuss how he might serve as what Doc Graham would call "a magnet." When Doc meets Ray in Minnesota, he asks Ray whether...

    Asked by camaro on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    The spiritual dimension of the love for baseball that has been a part of the narrative is evoked in the atmospheric descriptions of the empty baseball stadium. For example, the atmosphere of a...

    Asked by camaro on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Dreams and visions are of course a very important theme of this novel: dreams, and the sacrifices that are necessary to make them a reality. As the novel begins, the reader is presented with the...

    Asked by camaro on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    The message evident in the field becoming a place for second chances is that redemption is possible. The baseball field becomes a place where individuals who come to it find their second...

    Asked by camaro on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Initially, Richard cannot see the ball field. He does not believe. Even though his girlfriend is a believer in that which is not there and someone who "sees" what is not evident to others, Richard...

    Asked by camaro on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Karin possesses the gift of imagination. Her ability to see and announce the players on the field is reflective of a capacity that is of this world, but not subjected to it. She has the...

    Asked by camaro on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    This quote is significant because it describes how the ball field will pay for itself. Just as the field has embodied so many dreams for Ray and brought so much peace for him, the quote alludes to...

    Asked by camaro on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Doc's question strikes at the heart of what Ray is doing and the lives that Ray touches as he does it. When Doc Graham asks the question to Ray, it is at the point where they are talking with one...

    Asked by camaro on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Even though the quote was actually from Shaw, Kennedy's quote is highly appropriate in Kinsella's work. The basis of the narrative is that Ray sees things that others do not. When people like...

    Asked by camaro on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    One of the most significant things about the meeting between Gypsy and Ray is its embrace of mystery and the unexplainable in consciousness. The story is predicated upon the belief in that which...

    Asked by camaro on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    The basic conflict that exists between Ray and Mark embodies two different ways of looking at the world. Mark sees things in absolute and materialist terms. Being a businessman, Mark values...

    Asked by camaro on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Figurative language is an overall term used to describe various types of writing techniques that authors use to make their writing more interesting and more descriptive. Kinsella's text in Shoeless...

    Asked by camaro on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    The original question had to be edited. Karin's role is significant. On one level, her imagination enables her to see the baseball game. When others cannot, Karin can. This helps to illuminate...

    Asked by lydsxo on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    I think that there can be a couple of moments where the climax can be seen. I think that the moment in which Karin falls down and is about to take a fatal turn is a moment where the emotional and...

    Asked by rjina on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    One similarity between both characters is that they are shown to be both part of life and beyond life. They represent life because they were both real people in the narrative. Yet, they are in a...

    Asked by rjina on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    At first, Ray completes only one section of the field, left field, and at that point, shadowy, ethereal figures of the disgraced Unlucky Eight (banned from baseball after their involvement in a...

    Asked by mellissadawn on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    I tend to think that the voice, as mysterious as it might be, is where passion and zeal reside. In my mind, the voice's statements are examples of passion, where some type of response is needed to...

    Asked by burns04 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    In Shoeless Joe, while Ray's father Johnny died twenty years prior to the events of the novel, his influence is felt through Ray's love of baseball. Without that love, ingrained from a young age,...

    Asked by burns04 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    I think that the idea of collectivism and individualism is shown to be an everchanging dynamic. One does not live in either realm as Kinsella's work shows. It is everchanging. Shoeless Joe is a...

    Asked by thabarreto on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    The novel Shoeless Joe is really a story about the power of faith and the need to take a leap of faith in life. The writer’s theme is demonstrated in several ways. The narrator, Ray Kinsella,...

    Asked by burns04 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Shoeless Joe is a 1982 novel by W.P. Kinsella, best known for its film adaptation Field of Dreams. The protagonist, Ray Kinsella, is a man driven by his past and his dreams. He is visited by a...

    Asked by brittany83 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    The popular film Field of Dreams was based on W.P. Kinsella's 1982 novel Shoeless Joe. In the book, Ray Kinsella experiences "magic" in his field, hearing a voice advising that "if you build it,...

    Asked by brittany83 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    W.P. Kinsella's 1982 novel Shoeless Joe was famously adapted as Field of Dreams, starring Kevin Costner, and is considered a classic work. Ray Kinsella, who is a baseball devotee, hears the voice...

    Asked by besseyfamily on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    I would say that one particular connection between both narratives is the idea that sports can provide a transcendental realm for those who endure personal pain or questioning. For Ray, building a...

    Asked by polishqueenela on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    There are a couple of "missions" that Kinsella seems to carry with him as he writes the book. On one hand, he really seeks to bring out the glory and often criticized elements of Shoeless Joe...

    Asked by grommit on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    I think that the very idea of Salinger appearing in film would have caused a litigious nightmare that the producers would have not wanted for the film. I think that Salinger was so protective of...

    Asked by storywriter on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Kinsella's novel has some significant differences than the film. The most obvious is that J.D. Salinger is not present. Terrence Mann is the author who has become disenchanted with modern life....

    Asked by storywriter on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    I think that Kinsella's work does not feature much in way of passages that are famous or stand out on their own. Yet, I think that there are a coupe of important passages that really help to bring...

    Asked by abanoubelsobky on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Kinsella's work is five chapters. There is a structure to the manner in which the chapters are constructed. The first one establishes the basic exposition of the novel, in that the ball field is...

    Asked by dfryer24 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    The depiction of Salinger in Kinsella's work is an interesting one. It is unique because there is so little known about Salinger that it allows Kinsella to create a portrait that stirs the...

    Asked by mccarty317 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    I think that the examination of the father and son relationship in the work might lie with the exploration of baseball as a medium to connect generations. Both Ray and his father might have...

    Asked by nuggets5 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    I would assert a couple of ideas in answering this question. When we are looking at quotes from Kinsella’s work that have relevance to daily life, I think that the one cited does not work. I...

    Asked by neilinator on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    The book is so ladened with the power of redemption on so many fronts that you can make a case for nearly every major character as having undergone change and evolution. I am going to go with the...

    Asked by ajhor1811 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    Ray Kinsella is the protagonist and narrator of this story. He "fits in" to the story because the story is his. As a husband and father, he loves his family more than anything, though he is not...

    Asked by magicbubblesrock95 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Shoeless Joe
    It sounds like you are able to read the summary of Kinsella's work posted. The progressive issue that is following is that you want access to the lesson plans and other items. This might involve...

    Asked by rvue001 on via web

    1 educator answer.

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