Julius Caesar Homework Help

We’ve answered 301,781 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask Your Question
Browse Questions
  • Julius Caesar
    I would ask Mark Antony and Decius Brutus if they knew what was in Caesar’s will. Mark Antony and Decius Brutus were both lieutenants of Julius Caesar. In fact, you could say that they were the...

    Asked by risanimukhopadhyay on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    The answer to this question can be found in Brutus's funeral speech in Act 3, scene II, where he tries to explain to the Roman citizens why Caesar needed to die. He explains that no one loved...

    Asked by crownofvictoria830 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Brutus’s tragic flaw is his idealism, and his blindness to the potential for evil in man. He himself is honorable, and strives to justify his actions against Caesar in an honorable manner....

    Asked by user5306590 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    This is a great question! So many people read Julius Caesar and assume that women have no significant role in the text, but that is not true. The dynamic between Brutus and Portia (and Caesar and...

    Asked by iiiisupremeiiii on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Two examples of dramatic irony occur (1) in Act II, Scene 2 with Calpurnia's dream, which spurs her to plead with Caesar not to go to the Senate, and (2) in Act III, Scene 1. Much of the action of...

    Asked by torijustus on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Marullus and Flavius are horrified by the citizens’ celebrations upon Caesar’s return to Rome after the defeat of Pompey. Pompey was a hero whom the citizens loved and his opposition to Caesar...

    Asked by torijustus on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Decius understands how to play Caesar like a proverbial fiddle in Act 2 of “Julius Caesar”. Seeing that Calphurnia has convinced Caesar to stay away from the Senate, Decius without missing a...

    Asked by rbstansell18 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    CAESAR:I could be well moved, if I were as you;If I could pray to move, prayers would move me;But I am constant as the northern star,Of whose true-fix'd and resting qualityThere is no fellow in...

    Asked by smilezacevedo on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    The Romans of “Julius Caesar” spend a lot of time thinking and talking about planetary movements and other omens and what impact they have on human behavior. Caesar calls himself “constant as...

    Asked by rivanaved on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Mark Antony was perfectly willing to serve as Caesar's subordinate. He had no ambition to surpass him but would have been loyal to him indefinitely if he had not been killed. That is one reason why...

    Asked by vanessamyles15 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Antony is always characterized as a man who likes physical activities and physical pleasures. He is first shown in Julius Caesar preparing to participate in a footrace. He likes partying and having...

    Asked by tyashaakelman on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    The problem of violence and when it is justified is at the heart of “Julius Caesar”. The murder of Caesar is the act of violence first agonized over, then carried out in the first half of the...

    Asked by dcheninmoreno on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    You are quite correct in thinking that answer A has the best imagery, and I'll explain why. First, however, it helps to know why the other options are wrong. Answers B, C, and D do not really have...

    Asked by valecholak on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Act I Scene III Casca speaks: And yesterday the bird of night did sitEven at noon-day upon the marketplace,Hooting and shrieking. The discussion takes place on the eve of the Ides of March....

    Asked by stepialdana16 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Cassius is trying to convince Brutus to kill Caesar by telling him that it is their fault if they let him lead. At this point, Cassius is the leader of the conspiracy. When he makes this speech to...

    Asked by user6309452 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    In Act IV of Julius Caesar, Brutus and Cassius are engaged in a civil war against Octavius, Antony, and Lepidus. Brutus and Cassius meet to discuss problems in their ranks. Cassius is upset with...

    Asked by user5233768 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Shakespeare's Julius Caesar is about the political intrigue surrounding the assassination of the Roman dictator in 44 B.C. The main characters include Caesar, his ally Marc Antony and the main...

    Asked by gnaiyasmall on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    In the play Julius Caesar Brutus is essential to the success of the conspiracy for many reasons. Although Cassius initiates the conspiracy and manipulates Brutus to join the conspiracy, Brutus is...

    Asked by user5727751 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    The first example of repetition is in the beginning of the speech where Brutus is trying to get the audience to listen to him. In this part of the speech he emphasizes his actions by repeating the...

    Asked by michaelwkidwell on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    In Act I scene iii of Julius Caesar, Casca and Cassius meet in the streets of Rome to discuss omens, portents, and Caesar's future in Rome. Both men do not like Caesar and fear that his ambition...

    Asked by user8396741 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    We do know in the play Julius Caesar that Brutus is against the idea of him and the conspirators swearing an oath of loyalty to one another because he feels that if everyone is truly loyal, no oath...

    Asked by user7539731 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Antony's aim is to start a mutiny which will drive the conspirators out of Rome and enable him and Octavius to seize power in the city. He had that intention at the time he humbly asked Brutus for...

    Asked by user2544165 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Antony told the audience that Caesar loved them and left them money. In Antony’s famous funeral oration, he whips the crowd into a frenzy. His main objective is to convince them that Brutus and...

    Asked by sahasupratik320 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    The venerating of Brutus serves to foreshadow trouble between Antony and Octavius, who are both trying to bring about peace and gain more power for themselves. When you are the victor, you can...

    Asked by user1501717 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    This is a very interesting question! One would be tempted to say that the living Caesar, the larger-than-life figure we see at the start of the play, is more dominant. But truthfully, we see...

    Asked by user8979019 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Like in all of his writing, Shakespeare uses a plethora of figurative language to bring Julius Caesar to life for audiences orally, as well as physically on the stage. Imagery specifically refers...

    Asked by user5983226 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    The assassination of Julius Caesar and the resulting civil war come about because of envy on the part of Cassius, the idealism of Brutus, and the desire for revenge by Marc Antony. Cassius In Act...

    Asked by priestsammy50 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Act IV begins with Antony and Octavian, along with Lepidus, listing the names of those conspirators and alleged conspirators who might be problematic for them in the future. They say that Publius...

    Asked by natashabent on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Brutus gives a speech to the people explaining that even though he loved Caesar, he had to kill him in order to save Rome from his ambition. He then asks if anyone disagrees, and when no one voices...

    Asked by kh20 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Most round characters have several strengths and weaknesses. In Julius Caesar, Cassius is recognized as intelligent and convincing. On the other hand, his weaknesses include jealousy, a lack of...

    Asked by dioveon on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    The effect of Popilius' words is to add further to the dramatic tension leading up to the assassination. Popilius means exactly what he says. He knows that Cassius and a number of other...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Shakespeare often juxtaposes humor and tragedy. In fact, almost all of his major tragedies include "light" scenes that both cut through the tension and provide dramatic contrast with the...

    Asked by brittneydorsey on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Caesar is talking to Cassius and the conspirators when he says that he is constant and will not change his mind. By the time Caesar met up with the senators on the Ides of March, they had already...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    In his first conversation with Brutus, Cassius makes him aware of just how feeble and human Caesar actually is. He clearly resents the general opinion in which Caesar is deemed a demigod and wishes...

    Asked by damienragoobar on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Julius Caesar was assassinated because of his growing power over the senate. Caesar acquired numerous titles bestowed upon him by the senate. At the same time, most people in Rome believed he...

    Asked by raghavisinghal on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Many readers have questioned why Shakespeare's play should be called Julius Caesar when Caesar dies halfway through his play and the real tragic hero seems to be Brutus. Shakespeare was aware of...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    There are many different moods created throughout Julius Caesar. In the early part of the play there is a mood of growing tension and suspense. Everything seems to be building up to the attempted...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Antony did not have a change of heart. He never thought that Brutus was more noble than Julius Caesar. He thought that Brutus was the noblest man of all the conspirators. But he thought that Caesar...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Cassius is a complicated character, beginning the play as a fairly unsavory character, and then proving to be more human, if you will, as the story goes on. In Act I, though, we don't have a lot of...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    "Itching palm" is simply a slang term for being money-hungry. Brutus makes it clear what he means when he continues with the accusation. Let me tell you, Cassius, you yourselfAre much condemned to...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Antony does not seem to have changed his mind when he speaks of Brutus as the noblest Roman of them all. It is actually in Act 3, Scene 1 that he addresses Caesar's body in a marvelous soliloquy....

    Asked by gandalfpony on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Before Antony addresses the mob, he speaks an eloquent soliloquy ostensibly addressed to the dead Caesar. He reveals his intention of betraying Brutus and the others and causing a widespread riot...

    Asked by ndikumukiza15 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    This is an interesting question, and a good place to start might be whether or not you plan to talk about the qualities of a good leader or a bad leader, as there are both. Also, you'll need to...

    Asked by allierosiearf on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    When the play opens, it is only Cassius who shows how much he wants Brutus to become a part of the conspiracy he is trying to organize. Without Cassius there might never have been a conspiracy. He...

    Asked by janellpointer55 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Yes, pathos is a rhetorical device, and one that is used effectively in Julius Caesar. Typically, you hear about pathos in conjunction with two other rhetorical devices -- ethos and logos. To...

    Asked by emilymax777 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    An argument could be made that the main character, or protagonist, and hero of the Tragedy of Julius Caesar is Caesar himself. After all, the play's title is eponymous and normally, when...

    Asked by tberk1 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Both Antony and Brutus are intelligent, but they have different temperaments. Brutus is an introvert and Antony is very obviously an extrovert. Brutus is unworldly, while Antony is very worldly....

    Asked by samanthamilian8 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Julius Caesar is a complex play, with multiple themes running concurrently. One major theme found throughout the text is the theme of "power and leadership." We see what happens when Caesar's...

    Asked by user8971804 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    The nature of Brutus as either a hero or villain is open to differing opinions and this is based on the man’s character and his actions. Those who viewed Caesar as a hero would definitely view...

    Asked by shawtz on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Julius Caesar
    Brutus realized that he committed a mistake by participating in the assassination of Caesar when Caesar’s ghost appeared to him. He acknowledged this omen as a sign confirming his mistake and at...

    Asked by marisastar26 on via web

    1 educator answer.

Showing 1–50 of 1,910