Geology Homework Help

We’ve answered 301,757 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask Your Question
Browse Questions
  • Geology
    Correction: between G and K we also skipped the Cenomanian stage

    Asked by bucko on via web

    3 educator answers.

  • Geology
    Clouds start forming when the temperature equals the dew point. Given the air temperature and relative humidity, the dew point can be calculated as: Td = T - ((100-RH)/5) = 29 - ((100-50)/5) = 29 -...

    Asked by dreamdzign on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Science
    Metamorphic rocks are one of the three basic types of rock (the other two are igneous and sedimentary). Metamorphic rocks are formed from other types of rock through applied heat or pressure. In...

    Asked by Kayla_needs_help123 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Natural Disasters
    The Pacific “Ring of Fire” is the most geologically-dynamic region on the planet. The convergence of numerous minor and major plates creates endless tectonic activity and the string of...

    Asked by accge on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    The “Ring of Fire” refers to the physical geography of the region surrounding the Pacific Ocean, specifically, the undersea faults created by plate tectonics and the string of volcanoes that...

    Asked by accge on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Sial refers to the earth’s crusts upper layer, it is made up of rocks abundant in silicate and aluminium based minerals. The word Sial itself is an amalgam of the first two letters of aluminium...

    Asked by Sanskar223 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Science
    These are both geological terms. A pericline is a geological feature whereby the Earth's crust is folded either upward or downward in a regularly shaped contour pattern that gradually recedes to...

    Asked by shreenandkripa on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Science
    The coastal areas that surround the Pacific Ocean along North America, South America, and Asia and encompass tens of thousands of miles or coastline are commonly referred to as the "Ring of Fire"....

    Asked by accge on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Science
    The 2004 Indian ocean earthquake and tsunami was one of the deadliest natural disasters in human history, killing almost one quarter of a million people spread over an area of tens of thousands of...

    Asked by parama9000 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Science
    The process of breaking up of rocks by changes in weather phenomena such as temperature, moisture and precipitation is called weathering.Bare rock surfaces are exposed to various types of physical,...

    Asked by user3120320 on via iOS

  • Geology
    A particularly fascinating region of the Earth, the Ring of Fire is a series of volcanoes and extremely active seismic activity resulting from the plate tectonics prevalent around the perimeter of...

    Asked by accge on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    You can find lots of good sources at a Library (School or public). An encyclopedia, not wikipedia, will usually be at either, look up geology, and look through how rifts, mesas, mountains, and...

    Asked by emilyannehardwick on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Geology, as the attached eNotes essay points out, is the study of the Earth. Scientists – geologists – study the Earth’s surface and, to the extent possible through drilling, as much of the...

    Asked by bobbyroychoudhury7 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Science
    In simplest terms, "Mud Flow" is a form of mass movement in which muddy water flows or slides rapidly from one place to another. Mud could be nothing but a coarse, irregular combination of water,...

    Asked by bobbyroychoudhury7 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Studying layered sedimentary rocks is precisely the point of geochronology. Geochronology, of course, is the scientific practice of studying rocks and fossils for the purpose of determining their...

    Asked by ironstrike on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Science
    Silt and clay are both the result of the physical and chemical breakdown of the minerals in rocks. They main difference is in chemical composition and particle size. Silt is composed of silicate...

    Asked by nhl123 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Tornado is derived from the Spanish word 'tronada', which means 'to thunder'. It is the strongest known atmospheric disturbance with the wind velocity exceeding 300 km/hr. The most frequented...

    Asked by ericasmith2 on via web

  • Geology
    Seismology is the study of earthquakes. More specifically, it is the study of tremors in the Earth's crust that result from the movement of plate tectonics. The lithosphere of the Earth (the...

    Asked by anzkie on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Crust in geology is defined as the outermost solid surface of a planet or other celestial body in the universe. To compare, the Earth's crust is like the skin of an apple. Meaning, it is so thin...

    Asked by neal143 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    A cone of depression occurs solely in locations where there are wells, so they'll only be found on land. Normally the water table, the constant water level underground, sits at a certain depth...

    Asked by cusefilthy10 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Bulk density is the measure of the mass of a solid substance (particularly powder, granules or divided solids), with the total volume they occupy. The volume includes the volume of the particle,...

    Asked by hakkie on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    *crustal structures, not crystal I meant. Oy vey. Sorry I'm super tired. Not sure how to delete that tag.

    Asked by affejunge on via web

  • Geology
    As the Earth took shape—a process of accumulating space debris after the Big Bang—it formed a core, following physics rules of gravity, etc. The central core was eventually composed of iron,...

    Asked by shahjahanmalik on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    One major difference between oceans and land occurs in their respective crust formations. Oceanic crust is in a constant state of renewal. New crust material forms out of ocean vents where the...

    Asked by bluesongbird on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Volcanoes may serve as land building events. The Hawaiian islands were formed as lava from volcanoes from deep under the ocean's surface erupted and the magma cooled and increased the height of the...

    Asked by superking98 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    The physical structure of the Earth, starting from the center, consists of a solid inner core surrounded by a liquid outer core. The outer core is enveloped by a highly viscous layer called mantle...

    Asked by akatude on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Gravel is formed of rocks that are unconnected to each other. While common perception of gravel is smaller rocks anywhere between one and three inches around, official designation of gravel...

    Asked by wanderista on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Convection is a term used to describe the movement that results from the heat at the core of the Earth moving through the layers of the lower and upper mantle to the surface of the planet. As any...

    Asked by happyhelper77 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Researchers and scientists most certainly have come to a conclusion about the Bermuda Triangle. The bottom line is that it is an area with a lot of boat and airplane traffic, and it is prone to...

    Asked by kisstopher603 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Waterfalls can happen in any part of a river's system where massive erosion or an abrupt steepening of the river's channel exists. Waterfalls are very erosive. The power with which the water pours...

    Asked by sherryseah on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Halides are a class of mineral that contains a Halogen atom (non-metal elements in Group 17) and another, electropositive atom. Halides form in nature where sediments occur, often in shale. Because...

    Asked by orioles808 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Tropical rainforests, which are located near the equator in parts of South America, Central America, Mexico, the Caribbean, parts of Asia and Africa and Australia have warm temperatures that...

    Asked by the1andonly on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Alfred Wegener (1880-1930) was a German climatologist and geophysicist. In his book The Origin of Continents and Oceans (1915) he proposed the existence of Pangaea (Greek for "All Earth"), the...

    Asked by xnoe323x on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    All the different rocks found on the Earth are divided into three primary categories: igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic. All other smaller categories of rocks fall into one of these larger...

    Asked by link-from-the-void on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    On a shoreline where there are different types of rocks, some more and some less resistant to erosion, sediments such as sand and silt will be carried away, leaving behind the more resistant rocks....

    Asked by the1andonly on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    The science of plate tectonics has explained the slow motion of the continents over time, since the Earth cooled and the first land masses appeared. Alfred Wegener (1880-1930) noticed that South...

    Asked by fullhariths050 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Erosion is the movement of materials from one place to another, usually accomplished by wind, ice or water. Eventually, these materials including different sized sediments are deposited in a...

    Asked by sharanyaj on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Weathering is a process in which weather elements effect a change on geological elements. The weather process could involve wind, rain, sun, floods, and etc. There are several weathering elements...

    Asked by kmorris39 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    A Fault Inversion is the reactivation of a previously stable fault in the opposite direction to its original movement. Briefly, when a large amount of solid rock develops a split across its general...

    Asked by klmd on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    His beliefs foretold some of the problems of food shortage that the worls is facing today due to uncontrolled increase in population, although it wasn't fully accurate. Also, his theories provided...

    Asked by riddhi23 on via web

  • Geology
    The current version of the Earth's crust dates back about 225 million years, to the time of Pangea ("all earth.") That super continent has since broken up, and the fragments moved around the...

    Asked by mmmmr on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    but define to us one trait, show us one lineament, clear in awful differin online. sincerity; we may gasp in untold terror, but with that gasp we drink buy isoptin online.

    Asked by tufa on via web

  • Geology
    In strictly volcanic terms, they are two different kinds of depressions. A caldera is formed when a large eruption of magma, or lava, leaves a gigantic empty chamber underground. The volcanic...

    Asked by germanymc on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    The Earth’s lithosphere, which is the crust and upper most part of the upper mantle, is broken into tectonic plates which float in the more viscous asthenosphere, which is the remaining part of...

    Asked by sharanyarajendren on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    Scientists do not believe that humans were around when the continents split because they have good evidence for the dating of the splitting of the continents. There is plenty of evidence that...

    Asked by summertime222 on via web

    2 educator answers.

  • Geology
    Depositional environments are the geological environments where particular types of sediments are deposited. Geological processes will later work on these sediments to convert them into rocks (a...

    Asked by wnwillis on via web

    2 educator answers.

  • Geology
    This looks like a specific textbook answer, so your teacher is probably looking for those specific four factors. Since I don't have your textbook, here are the four variables I would use to...

    Asked by amberwe on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    The idea here is that the Precambrian is way longer ago than mammals are believed to have existed. So a famous scientist once said that if they found rabbits in the Precambrian he'd say the theory...

    Asked by beefheart on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    A rift valley is, of course, a valley. It is long and and relatively straight. It runs between two ranges of mountains. The way that rift valleys are formed is by the spreading of geological...

    Asked by aviralvardiya on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Geology
    The upper zone in the ocean is known as the euphotic zone and as its name indicates, is bathed in light. Depending on how clear the water is, it can extend to about 660 feet in depth. Here you will...

    Asked by harrypotter01 on via web

    1 educator answer.

Showing 1–50 of 143