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  • History
    The Quartering Act of 1765 required the colonists to provide housing and shelter to the British soldiers. While this act did not require colonists to house soldiers in their private homes, public...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    You are speaking about a very important symbol from Chapter 3 of Anderson's young adult novel called Chains. The seeds are important to Isabel because they are not only a reminder of her family...

    Asked by sross1966 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    The document on Page 13 is what we would call a 'want ad' in the classified section. It is akin to a lost and found posting. It was printed on May 27, 1776 in a local paper. This was mere months...

    Asked by gsmith01 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Pick something that you do not like in people and chances are that Mr. Lockton is also that way. Is he a liar? Yep, he has got that one covered in spades. He lies to just about everyone, and...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    The statement is a metaphor that describes Isabel's personality. When people think of lions, they tend to connote things like beauty, strength, power, loyalty, aggression, etc. That's Isabel....

    Asked by amybogansky on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Slavery was indeed a part of life in the city as well as the countryside. Statistically 95% of slaves in America lived on plantations or farms. This was true in part because of practicality and...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    For the first major event, I'm going to go with the opening death and burial of Miss Mary Finch. Without her death, Isabel and Ruth would never have been sold over to the Lockton family. It was...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Let's start with blood character-relations for Lady Seymour. Lady Seymour is Master Lockton's aunt. Master Lockton and his wife are the two characters that take over ownership of Isabel and Ruth...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Miss Mary Finch was one of the more humane slave owners. This makes her different from other slave owners in the historical context of Chains. One way in which her views differed from those of...

    Asked by hannah1135 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    We learn that the code to get into the rebel camp is "ad astra" in Chapter 16 of Laurie Halse Anderson's novel Chains, just after Colonel Regan of the rebel forces promises to "do what is in [his]...

    Asked by riggio-sis on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Hello! Although the novel doesn't fully expound on how Curzon gets sent to jail, Chapter 34 starts out with Isabel telling us about a party to celebrate the capture of Fort Washington, complete...

    Asked by heyitslinhchi on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Isabel's mother is critical in establishing the foundation of bravery that defines her daughter's character. Isabel's mother does not establish a fully active role in the narrative. However, she...

    Asked by toby45 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    In Chapter XIV of Laurie Halse Anderson's Chains, Master Lockton is in the back room of the house with Goldbuttons and the mayor discussing the rising rebellion of the colonists against the king of...

    Asked by shanr533 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    In Laurie Halse Anderson’s Chains, Elihu and Anne Lockton represent the upper-scale, refined elite of New York City. First, indications that Isabel and Ruth’s new owners are wealthy occurs in...

    Asked by silvy727 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Depending on the character, the novel, and the conflict seen, freedom will vary from book to book. Consider each character's motivations and background. What drives them to do what they do? What...

    Asked by dylanmitchell on via web

    2 educator answers.

  • Chains
    In the beginning of Laurie Halse Anderson’s novel Chains, Isabel, the 13-year-old protagonist, and her mentally disabled younger sister are slaves with the advantage of a relatively benign...

    Asked by besendorfer on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Resolution is a term used to describe the solving or resolving of the crisis or problem in a story or novel. Think of the diagram of a short story where the beginning is the introduction of the...

    Asked by nelsondenotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    When Ruth has a seizure, Madam Lockton savagely abuses her. When she suffers her seizure, Madam Lockton assumes Ruth is possessed by the devil. She then proceeds to beat her with a chair and with...

    Asked by akshaysp26 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    An early indication of 13-year-old Isabel’s personality and temperament is evident following the funeral service for the young slave’s former owner, Miss Mary Finch, who had granted Isabel and...

    Asked by taevara on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Isabel is the 13-year-old protagonist and narrator of Laurie Halse Anderson’s 2008 novel Chains. Together with mentally disabled younger sister Ruth, Isabel is sold into slavery, first to a...

    Asked by lexijane5 on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Details about Ruth, the younger sister of the narrator of Laurie Halse Anderson’s novel Chains emerge gradually as the story progresses, but they do emerge. Ruth is Isabel’s five-year-old...

    Asked by jsjkb on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    New York City serves as the backdrop for much of the action in the novel. It is in New York City where the Queen's Ball is thrown. New York was the center of activity, and a domain where British...

    Asked by jsjkb on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    This is a pretty broad question, especially considering that Lady Seymour was always doing something new and rather outrageous, at least as seen through Isabel's eyes. In Chains by Laurie Halse...

    Asked by mari20005 on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Chains by Laurie Halse Anderson is set in the Revolutionary War period in the North. Isabel and her younger sister Ruth are young black girls who should have been freed when their beloved owner...

    Asked by lbezlyk on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Laurie Halse Anderson's young adult novel Chains is set in pre-Revolutionary War America, and the protagonist is a thirteen-year-old slave girl named Isabel. Through the course of the novel she has...

    Asked by girlloves1dx3 on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Freedom is shown to be something that must be pursued actively and for which a fight is needed. Like the Colonists in the story, freedom is not easy. Freedom is something that is elusive for an...

    Asked by flopsy134 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    The setting of this popular young adult novel is pre-American Civil War Manhattan. The focus on the life of Isabel, a young slave who, in spite of being given her freedom by her former owner, is...

    Asked by russbone on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    She was approximately arrested for 3.5 months

    Asked by summerpadilla200 on via web

  • Chains
    The beast referred to on page 89 of Laurie Halse Anderson's Chains is George Washington. George Washington, or General Washington, is part of the revolution. As a member of the party who desires...

    Asked by katarm on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    One condition of life for slaves of the 1700s was a lack of control over their lives. Isabel reflects this in Anderson's work. Slaves were sent from one plantation to another. They lived a life...

    Asked by nya1 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Given the historical condition in which the book takes place, essential vocabulary can be pulled from both literary and social contexts. On one hand, I think that "slavery" is an essential...

    Asked by samuelwendt101 on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    WELL. Isabel dose reaction quite positively when madam ask her about the prison.

    Asked by jennybetancourt64 on via web

  • Chains
    The paramount geographical place of importance is New York City. This is where Isabel and Ruth live as the property of the Locktons. This is also where Isabel is approached by Curzon to spy on the...

    Asked by user9253840 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    The most important geographic area is New York City at the time of the American Revolution. Not everyone was sympathetic to slaves in the North, including in New York. During the American...

    Asked by user9253840 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Isabel pays a high emotional and physical price for freedom. When she remarks to Curzon at the end of the book that she thinks that they "have crossed the River Jordan," she does so at an amazing...

    Asked by colleenmac on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Isabel is the main character of the novel Chains by Laurie Halse Anderson. Isabel is a thirteen-year old slave girl, struggling to get her freedom during the time of American Revolutionary War....

    Asked by jfurndoifu on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    The "Hessians" I know of are people from Hesse-Cassel or from Hesse Hanau, principalities (governed by a prince) in Germany. In historical terms, the men were excellent mercenary soldiers for hire.

    Asked by ambien30 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    The primary focus of chapter 35 is Isabel reaching out to the imprisoned Curzon. This is significant for a couple of reasons. The first is that Isabel is stepping outside of her "chained"...

    Asked by josephrende on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    The reference to the River Jordan comes at the very end of this book, when Curzon and Isabel flee and row across the river to New Jersey and freedom. It is only when they reach the other side that...

    Asked by user5464379 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    From the very title of this text to the choice of the protagonist as being a slave who endures significant hardship, it is clear that Anderson is using her story to expose the injustice and cruelty...

    Asked by user5464379 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    In Chapter 43, Isabel discovers that her mistress had not actually sold Ruth but that she was in Charleston in the Lockston's estate. She discovers this fact in the most cruel way possible, as her...

    Asked by mrb17123 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Chapter 11 narrates what happens when Becky and Isabel are tidying the drawing room and uncovering furniture to get it ready for use by the family. Just as they are starting to do this task, rebel...

    Asked by user3850269 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    There is an example of Madam Lockton's cruelty early on in the narrative. When Madam Lockton's belongings are being searched in public, Ruth and Isabel find the awkwardness of the moment as...

    Asked by docsbd on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    This is something that the novel is not clear about. In Chapter 43, Madam reveals to Isabel that Ruth has not actually been sold, as she was led to believe, but that she has been living at the...

    Asked by user2851150 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Here is a brief summary of Chains, by Laurie Halse Anderson. Isabel is a young slave living in the time of the Revolutionary War. She is promised freedom when her owner dies, but instead she and...

    Asked by mrb17123 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    The answer to this question can be found in Chapter 6, which is when Isabel discovers what Curzon is really doing apart from being a slave, and Curzon tells her about his work for the rebels and...

    Asked by mrb17123 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    I think that one of the most powerful lessons that the book teaches is what Faulkner might call the capacity of human beings to suffer. This capacity for endurance is what eventually fosters the...

    Asked by martez413 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    I think that Isabel's narrative brings out how the Patriots' view of freedom is a complex one. In one sphere, it is evident that Isabel understands the motivation for freedom. She recognizes that...

    Asked by gorhamfamily on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Anderson constructs the dehumanization of slavery in some distinct ways throughout the narrative. One particular example of this is when Ruth and Isabel are brought home and not allowed to take...

    Asked by kpoplover12345 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Chains
    Isabel recognizes clearly the condition in which she lives. She is to be moved from one setting of enslavement to another. Her own life and personal experience is moot in the face of the...

    Asked by woahrini on via web

    1 educator answer.

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