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  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    John Keats, in his poem Bright Star: Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art, seems to experiencing the deeply felt urge to remain forever as he is now, a solitary figure but with his head resting...

    Asked by mrcds09 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    Two words used in this poem refer to its religious imagery. The first word is 'Eremite' in the fourth line and the other word is 'ablution' in the sixth line. 'Eremite' means a hermit, usually with...

    Asked by eahackett22 on via web

    2 educator answers.

  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    Keats is well-known for his affinity with and appreciation of nature and his poetry is the expression of this. There is a wistful and sad tone to this poem as Keats is aware of his impending death...

    Asked by user2697780 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Jane Eyre
    Arguably, the love presented in both of these texts is romantic in its presentation, but the love presented in "Bright Star" is more realistic through the speaker's realisation that such intimacy...

    Asked by iminspace on via web

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  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    "Sweet unrest" are the two words that Keats uses to capture the feeling he has when he lies pressed against his lover in the moonlight. Even though there is an oxymoron in the juxtaposition of the...

    Asked by pratsocr on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    It is hard not to read this poem and feel immense sympathy for the speaker, especially if the biographical information of Keats is taken into consideration and his suspicions of his early death....

    Asked by johnsmith1492 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    Key to exploring the sense of place in this poem is recognising the way in which this poem describes both the "Bright Star" of the title and also the world that it overlooks. The sense of place...

    Asked by cbabiarczyk on via web

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  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    To consider place in “Bright Star! Would I Were Steadfast as Thou Art” time must also be considered. The two places discussed in the poem are the speaker's place on earth and the position of...

    Asked by cbabiarczyk on via web

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  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    Bright StarBright star, would I were steadfast as thou art —Not in lone splendour hung aloft the nightAnd watching, with eternal lids apart,Like Nature's patient, sleepless Eremite,The moving...

    Asked by lollypop0710 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    The main quality of the star is that it is eternal. We can see this in the poet's use of the word "steadfast" and in his use of the actual word "eternal" to describe the way that the star watches...

    Asked by lou941 on via web

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  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    The topic of this poem is love. In this poem, the speaker is using the idea of the star that shines bright and eternally as a way of talking about his love for a woman. In this poem, the speaker...

    Asked by frnber on via web

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  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    Apostrophe is used most often in poetry to add emotional intensity; the emotional intensity of "Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art" comes from Keats' viewing of the planet Venus...

    Asked by hick-ee on via web

    2 educator answers.

  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    The possible denotations of that repeated "still" are the possible literal definitions of what still means. First of all, it means holding one's position for a long time, not moving, remaining...

    Asked by hokiki on via web

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  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    My favorite Keats poem is "Ode to a Grecian Urn". There are plenty of images there--the lovers just before they kiss under a tree in Spring, the tree that never loses its leaves, the cow...

    Asked by r0sered17 on via web

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  • Bright Star! Would I Were as Steadfast as Thou Art
    Death, love and ambition are the three-fold themes of this poem. In the first four lines, the poet fears that he may die before he can achieve fame, or consummate his love. These lines show that he...

    Asked by june7 on via web

    2 educator answers.