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  • Aesop's Fables
    The north wind and the sun both aim for the same thing: to show that they are strong, but they go about this in different ways, as illustrated in their contest to remove the coat from a traveller...

    Asked by ivygirl66 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Aesop's Fables
    Looks like you are off to a nice start with your paper. I think I would move your opening sentence ("Gentleness is more persuasive than violence.") to a later point in the paper. That sentence...

    Asked by kerifoconnor on via web

    2 educator answers.

  • Aesop's Fables
    I think that the premise of the question has to be expanded. There are multiple fables in the compendium and each one features a different conflict and resolution. The stories that become the...

    Asked by kisstopher603 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Aesop's Fables
    A fable is a very small "tale" (written as prose—straight writing—or verse, also called poetry) which includes: animals, mythical creatures, plants, inanimate objects, or forces of nature......

    Asked by kisstopher603 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Aesop's Fables
    In Aesop's Fable of "Tthe Fox and the Grapes," we learn that the fox wants a cluster of grapes hanging from a trees. He tries over and over to jump high enough to reach for them, with no success....

    Asked by kisstopher603 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Aesop's Fables
    There is much in way of integrity shown through this fable. The most dominant display of it is through the frog's actions. Understanding the risk of death at the sting of the scorpion, the frog...

    Asked by cls1997 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Aesop's Fables
    As with all of the fables that are attributed to Aesop, the story of the bear and the bees (or the bee hives) is meant to teach a moral lesson. In this case, the lesson is that a person's reaction...

    Asked by kind12 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • Aesop's Fables
    A fable is a fictitious story made up or told to illustrate or teach a moral. Though many popular and famous fables do feature animals, that behave in some respects like humans, - for example, they...

    Asked by godnara2 on via web

  • Aesop's Fables
    The fox’s claim is a rationalization for failure or inability. Students may miss the moral that human beings should not justify their own shortcomings by resorting to distortions and lies. Aesop...

    Asked by dman654 on via web

  • Aesop's Fables
    The plot develops out of the desire the fox has for the grapes as contrasted with his inability to reach them. The resolution is his minimizing the reward he cannot gain. The conclusion is...

    Asked by markwel on via web

  • Aesop's Fables
    The fox is personified, as it has human traits. The fox exhibits these normal traits: He needs to satisfy his hunger, and knows that he can get the grapes only by leaping for them. He is also...

    Asked by lou941 on via web