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  • 1984
    O'Brien's role in the third part of 1984 is to reprogram Winston's thoughts so that he internalizes the values of the Party. Winston's fundamental crime lies not in what he did, though that is...

    Asked by hjh9998 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In Part 1, Chapter 1, of 1984, the reader learns that all male party members are in short supply of razor blades. This is repeated in Part 1, Chapter 5, during a conversation in which O'Brien asks...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In Part 1 of 1984, Orwell makes a number of important points about the nature of people and society. First of all, Orwell suggests that children are extremely susceptible to propaganda. This view...

    Asked by user1512578 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    George Orwell, in his futuristic dystopian novel 1984, creates a language called "newspeak" which epitomizes the style and manner of thinking of totalitarian regimes. The goal of "newspeak" within...

    Asked by jallen10 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In 1984, the police patrol uses helicopters to carry out its task. These helicopters can hover in between buildings in order to allow the police to look in through people's windows. Snooping allows...

    Asked by user8729811 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    While the party maintains that it operates for the good of society, Winston and the people of Oceania suffer at the hands of the party on a daily basis. In the opening paragraphs of the book, for...

    Asked by yeseniatorres902 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    The Party uses surveillance, thought control, endless war, and endless propaganda to control Party members in 1984. As we learn early in the novel, the television screen in every one's apartment...

    Asked by user4118247 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In 1984, war is a constant presence in the lives of the people of Oceania. It is used by the party in two important ways. First of all, war is used to increase people's loyalty towards the party....

    Asked by angelatheastronaut on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    The government in 1984 demands that no tension exists between inward and outward conformity. The state insists not only on outward obedience to its laws and dictates but that its citizens' minds...

    Asked by lildpeaceout on via web

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  • 1984
    In 1984, we see very differing attitudes to intimacy in the characters of Julia and Katharine, both of whom play an important role in Winston's life. Katharine is Winston's wife and she appears in...

    Asked by carlojoyce0454 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In 1984, Julia is Winston's girlfriend and his co-conspirator against Big Brother and the party. While Winston is an idealist and thinker who seeks to bring down the party for the sake of humanity,...

    Asked by user5746253 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    You would probably address the letter to Big Brother. According to the novel, Big Brother may or may not exist as a human being. In Winston's conversation with O'Brien, Winston asks about Big...

    Asked by onatyapici on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    For Winston, his relationship with Julia is problematic because it violates party rules. As a result, every moment he spends with her is fraught with insecurity and prevents him from being truly...

    Asked by user7372944 on via web

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  • 1984
    In 1984 and Fahrenheit 451 authoritarian states practice mind control over their citizens. In Fahrenheit 451, the government has banned books and the central character, Montag, works as "fireman"...

    Asked by haziqahmadaziz2233 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    Eric Arthur Blair (who wrote 1984 and his other works under the pen name George Orwell) was a 19th-century English author and journalist. Blair was born in India. He later moved to Europe to become...

    Asked by fatimashokor98765432 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In 1984, Winston finds a piece of coral encased in glass in an old junk shop. It's a paperweight, and to him, it represents the time before the Party came into power, a time Winston dimly remembers...

    Asked by ndaneric on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In George Orwell's dystopian classic 1984, protagonist Winston Smith purchases a diary and begins recording his secret thoughts therein. As a literary convention, Winston's diary entries help move...

    Asked by user254212 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    The society in George Orwell's 1984 is an anti-individualistic society. People engage in group-think rather than forming their own thoughts and opinions, because self-expression is illegal....

    Asked by user7132145 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In 1984, this quote appears when Winston is relating to Julia a dream that he had about his mother. In this dream, Winston returns to his childhood and relives the last day he spent with his mother...

    Asked by mel123ina on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In 1984, a telescreen is a dual-purpose device: it broadcasts party propaganda to the people of Oceania while also watching and recording their every move. As such, the telescreens are located in a...

    Asked by nadeenali12 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In Part Three, Chapter One of 1984, there are two people from Winston's life who are thrown into his cell. The first is Ampleforth, a poet and co-worker of Winston's, who worked in the Records...

    Asked by herrerabrezza on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    The key words are: indoctrination and manipulation. Indoctrination and manipulation, as every reader of 1984 knows, are the key strategies of the Party to maintain control of the population. This...

    Asked by ellensohn on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    Rats symbolize Winston’s biggest fear. He has an unnatural terror of them. We first witness this in the “shabby little room” above Mr. Charrington’s shop. Julia casually mentions seeing a...

    Asked by brown487 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    Winston could be called the "last artist" in 1984 for several reasons. First, he is old enough to have memories from the time before the Party came into power. He recalls, for example, fragments of...

    Asked by lilili226 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In Book 2, Chapter 7, Julia says: "It's the one thing they can't do. They can make you say anything -- anything -- but they can't make you believe it. They can't get inside you." What Julia means...

    Asked by cripnation3911 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In Part 1, Chapter 1 of 1984, Winston sees the three party slogans etched on to the building of the Ministry of Truth. These are: WAR IS PEACE FREEDOM IS SLAVERY IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH To the...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In my copy of 1984 (Penguin, London, 1990), you will find this quote on pages 41-42, though it may be slightly different in yours. Either way, this quote appears in Part 1, Chapter 4 of the book,...

    Asked by yoloislife on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    One of the ideas prevalent in 1984 is the idea of the government controlling the people. When Winston is talking to Julia about the war, she expresses the opinion that it is not real. “The...

    Asked by user5708261 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    The old-fashioned clock serves three purposes in 1984. First, it helps create a sense of a new or very different world in the mind of the reader. Most readers at the time the book was published...

    Asked by user9518949 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In 1984, Winston receives the briefcase with 'the book' inside on Sunday, the day before Hate Week begins. We know this because he tells us that on the fifth day of Hate Week he has had the book in...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In this chapter of 1984, Julia raises some important ideas about the party which come as a surprise to Winston because they represent, to him, a completely different way of thinking. First of all,...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    According to the Party, Emmanuel Goldstein was a former member who left to form what is referred to in hushed tones as the "Brotherhood," a sort of dissident organization. Goldstein, as a former...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In Part 1, Chapter 8 of 1984, Winston follows an old man into a pub. As soon as he enters, he looks around for a telescreen: "It was horribly dangerous, but at any rate there was no telescreen in...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In George Orwell’s 1984, we know for certain that Jones, Rutherford, and Aaronson were early leaders of the Revolution. We also know that they were tortured because they came to be seen as...

    Asked by zbevis8 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In 1984, Emmanuel Goldstein is the purported leader of the underground resistance movement against the party. In Goldstein's book, the "machine" refers to the surplus of goods which are produced in...

    Asked by jsimmons19 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    This answer assumes the "our own society" in question is the United States of America. Primarily, both groups see war as a means of resource consumption. The United States government awards massive...

    Asked by jsimmons19 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In 1984, it is impossible for Winston and Julia to be seen together in public because their relationship is not sanctioned by the party. In fact, the party actively encourages people to become...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In Part 2, Chapter 10, of 1984, Winston and Julia's rebellion against the party is dramatically exposed and the Thought Police surround them in the room above Mr Charrington's shop. During their...

    Asked by jamesparkes1973 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    At the end of this chapter, Winston has finally managed to sit next to the girl at lunch and exchanged a plan to meet publicly, in a crowd, in order to avoid detection. They meet that evening as...

    Asked by user1726262 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    Big Brother manipulates minds in several ways. First, the city (or all of Eurasia?) is slathered with posters of "Big Brother" with eyes "that follow you about when you move" (3) that read " BIG...

    Asked by harisaro2k on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    Literary techniques is a pretty broad term. I'll give you several examples of different types that can contribute to the development of a theme: Characterization: the art of creating a character...

    Asked by user8309291 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    Some of the most important scenes of 1984 occur in Part 2 of the book. The first comes in Chapter 2, when Winston and Julia meet in secret in the woods. This is the beginning of their romantic...

    Asked by ameliaj2000 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In 1984, there are lots of references to technology and its impact. The most obvious of these is the telescreen, the party's means of spying on the people of Oceania. It monitors party members...

    Asked by khushippatel01 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    If there is no written record of the past, then any given population is entirely dependent on their own memories. Memories are fickle and fade. They tend to fade more and more as generations...

    Asked by adrianag133 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In George Orwell's 1984, protagonist Winston Smith works at the Ministry of Truth. Like all the governmental ministries in 1984, the name "Ministry of Truth" is a misnomer, for really it is a...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In Part 3, Chapter 3, of 1984, a conversation ensues between Winston and O'Brien about the nature of life under the party. Winston says to O'Brien that he believes the party will be defeated by the...

    Asked by user2544558 on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    George Orwell’s book 1984 describes political changes and the suppression of people’s ideals and individuality. The book creates a society in which people are watched at all times by their...

    Asked by rylapersiancat on via web

  • 1984
    Winston and Katharine ultimately parted because they realized they were unable to have children. Winston and Katharine did not love one another--Winston loathed her and had even considered...

    Asked by michellelopez on via iOS

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In Part 2 Chapter 8 of 1984, Winston and Julia go to O'Brien's apartment. Like other citizens of Oceania, O'Brien has a telescreen in his apartment, which monitors his actions, but with one key...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

  • 1984
    In Part 2, Chapter 2, of 1984, Winston and Julia meet in the woods and he admits to being shocked by the "coarseness of her language." Whenever Julia talks about the party, for example, she uses...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer.

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