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Are there any similes or metaphors in "A Christmas Memory?" Are there conflicts or...

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smileyooji | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted June 4, 2008 at 2:41 PM via web

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Are there any similes or metaphors in "A Christmas Memory?" Are there conflicts or climax or etc. in this story?

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ermoran | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted June 5, 2008 at 2:00 PM (Answer #1)

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I'm not familiar with that sorry.  But there is a real easy way to find out if there is a simile or metaphor in the story or sentence.  Which ever it is.  A simile has the word "like".  And the metaphor has the word "is".  I'm also pretty sure that you can use a plot graph with any story.  But I'm not 100% sure or not.

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ladyvols1 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted December 16, 2008 at 6:33 AM (Answer #2)

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There are similes in “A Christmas Memory” “She is small and sprightly, like a bantam hen;” When speaking of the baby carriage Buddy says, “the wheels wobble like a drunkard’s legs.”  When counting money the quarters are counted and compared to rocks, “Nickels and quarters worn as smooth as creek pebbles.” And Buddy describing Haha’s café says, “river trees where moss drifts through the branches like gray mist.”

There are several conflicts in the story; one is the conflict of Buddy and his distant cousin against the other members of the household.  The conflict of how Buddy and his cousin will manage to get 30 fruitcakes made and mailed out before Christmas.  Another conflict is the depression era economy.

 "Time is its dominant structural element. There are two time periods in the story: the present, in which the narrator relates the story, and the distant past, when the narrator was a boy. The narrator quickly moves the reader into the distant past by issuing a series of commands: "Imagine a morning in late November...Consider the kitchen of a spreading old house." At the climax of the story, as Buddy and his cousin fly kites on Christmas day, die narrator brings the reader back to the present: "This is our last Christmas together."  

The climax is when Buddy is sent away to military school.  The resolution to the novel is the death of the cousin and Buddy says “home is where my friend is, and there I never go.”

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